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Rogers Media Expands Local Coverage in Waterloo Region with Debut of KitchenerTodaycom

first_img Facebook KITCHENER, ON Residents of the Tri-Cities have a new home for local community news with the launch of KitchenerToday.com. Led by Rogers Media’s award-winning news and talk radio station, 570 NEWS, the digital site features local news, community events, obituaries, entertainment, current affairs, and weather.KitchenerToday.com also features live stream video from the Rogers tv community channel. With a focus on hyper local content, audiences will get their morning started with The Jennifer Campbell Show, and stay engaged and informed on current affairs throughout the day with The Mike Farwell Show.“The debut of KitchenerToday.com shows how committed we are to investing in our community,” said Mark Campbell, Director of News Programming, 570 NEWS. “As today’s media landscape continues to evolve, we saw a great opportunity to expand our local news coverage in Kitchener, Waterloo, and Cambridge, and to continue to deliver award-winning stories that our audiences rely on.” Advertisement In collaboration with Village Media, the digital news network is offered on smartphone, desktop, and tablet.Highly respected in the industry for building successful locally-focused digital news sites, KitchenerToday.com marks the third collaboration between Rogers Media and Village Media. Indicative of audiences’ desire for hyperlocal content, both HalifaxToday.ca and OttawaMatters.com, have experienced great success reaching more than 1 million people since launch in October 2017, and 300,000 people since launch in March 2018, respectively*.KitchenerToday.com serves residents of Waterloo Region and Southern Ontario. Rogers Media is the exclusive advertising representative to sell Canadian advertising inventory on KitchenerToday.com.Source: *Google Analytics, since date of launch to June 13, 2018Social Media LinksLike KitchenerToday.com on FacebookFollow KitchenerToday.com on Twitter @KitchenerTodayAbout Rogers MediaRogers Media is a diverse media and content company that engages more than 30 million Canadians each week. The company’s multimedia offerings include 55 radio stations, 29 local TV stations, 23 conventional and specialty television stations, 9 magazines, podcasts, digital and e-commerce websites, and sporting events. Rogers Media delivers unique storytelling through its range of powerful brands: Maclean’s, City, OMNI Television, Today’s Parent, TSC, KiSS, FX, Sportsnet – Canada’s #1 specialty network, and the Blue Jays, Canada’s only Major League Baseball team. Rogers Media is a subsidiary of Rogers Communications Inc. (TSX, NYSE: RCI). Visit RogersMedia.com. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Login/Register With: Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

SUBSCRIBE TO THE eBOSS CANADA DAILY NEWSLETTER

first_img Twitter Advertisement eBOSS Canada will be launching a daily newsletter in appx. 2 weeks.Every morning at 7am you will receive the latest Industry news, Casting Calls, Job Notices, Upcoming Events and much more.We promise not to spam you. Start your day with eBOSS.CLICK HERE TO SIGN-UP.TO VIEW OR POST CASTING NOTICES: CLICK HERETO VIEW OR POST CREW & JOB NOTICES: CLICK HERE.ADD YOUR COMPANY (OR YOUR SERVICES) TO THE PRODUCTION DIRECTORYAre you a Freelancer?  Crew?Do you work behind the scenes?Are you a production company?Do you provide a service to the Canadian Entertainment Industry?CLICK HERE TO REGISTER IN THE FREE PRODUCTION DIRECTORYFree to RegisterFree to Search.FOLLOW eBOSS CANADA ON SOCIAL MEDIA  The Entertainment Business One-Stop ShopFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/eboss.canada/Twitter: https://twitter.com/eBOSSCanadaInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/eBOSSCanada/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/ebosscanada Advertisement Facebook Advertisement Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

Teen shot by Edmonton police mourned by family friends

first_imgAPTN National NewsFriends and family of shooting victim Cyrus Green are mourning their loss on the Cold Lake First Nation, Alta., today.The 17 year-old was fatally shot by Edmonton police over the weekend.APTN National News reporter Noemi LoPinto has this story.last_img

Lawsuit launched over brutal bus killing

first_imgAPTN National NewsTwo female passengers who witnessed the gruesome killing of Tim McLean, a Metis man in 2008 on a Greyhound bus have launched a multi-million dollar lawsuit.McLean was beheaded on the outskirts of Portage La Prairie, Man., by Vince Li, a mentally ill fellow passenger.Dozens of horrified passengers witnessed the attack.Two women who saw the killing are suing Greyhound, the federal government and the RCMP.One of those women is Kayli Shaw from London, Ont. She is seeking a total of $3 million in damages.last_img

Concerns over serious lack of security in Nunavuts courts

first_imgAPTN National NewsIn an unprecedented move, Nunavut’s Chief judge delivered an ultimatum to the territory’s government.Either have adequate security in place at the Nunavut Court of Justice by 9:30 the next morning, or he would close down a manslaughter trial.When faced with the judges resolve, the government blinked first.APTN‘s Kent Driscoll has this from Iqaluit.last_img

Canada has a racism problem AFN National Chief

first_imgAPTN National News OTTAWA–Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde says Canada has a racism problem across the country.Bellegarde was responding to a cover story by Maclean’s magazine claiming Canada has a bigger race problem than the U.S. The story focused on Winnipeg claiming racism in the city was the “ugliest” in the country.Bellegarde said he saw racism as a national problem.“I think we have to do a lot more to address it,” said Bellegarde, in an interview with Nation to Nation to air later Thursday. “It is not in any particular region, it is right across Canada.”The national chief told Maclean’s he believed colonialism was at the root of racism in Canada.“Colonialism didn’t just impact Aboriginal people,” Bellegarde said to the magazine. “It forever changed the way the European population on the Prairies would see Aboriginals as a problem, never a partner.”Bellegarde said Canada’s colonialism has spawned a litany sins against Indigenous people.“We have got to repair this relationship in this this land. It has been affected by colonialism, it has been affected by the imposition of residential schools, which is cultural genocide, it has been affected by the economic marginalization of the lands and resources being exploited without our being involved,” he said.Bellegarde said one of the ways to begin reversing Canada’s existing racism is to education children about the treaties and residential schools.Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt’s office did not return request for comment as of this article’s posting.–More to comenews@aptn.ca@APTNNewslast_img read more

Indigenous women strongest people in the world former NWAC president

first_imgAPTN National NewsIt was an inspiring and emotional graduation for a group of Indigenous women.They had finished an intensive leadership program about creating social change and empowering women.They also got some inspiration from a the keynote speaker.APTN’s Trina Roache has the story.last_img

Quebec chief says independent investigation bureau will not address policing crisis in

first_imgTom Fennario APTN National NewsCan police forces be trusted to properly investigate other police?Many of Quebec’s First Nations say no.The province agrees and is working on a solution.But will it be enough to get to the bottom of what many see as a deep rooted problem?tfennario@aptn.caFollow @tfennariolast_img

Ottawa police officer Chris Hrnchiar pleads guilty to discreditable conduct

first_imgAPTN National NewsOttawa police sergeant Chris Hrnchiar pleaded guilty to two counts of discreditable conduct in court Tuesday and apologized for his actions.The charges followed an investigation by the professional standards section of the Ottawa police service that found Hrnchiar wrote racist and disparaging comments about Indigenous people after the death of Inuk artist Annie Pootoogook.Pootoogook’s body was found in the Rideau river outside downtown Ottawa Sept. 19.See related stories here: Annie PootoogookThe comments were posted by Hrnchiar through Facebook in response to an Ottawa Citizen story about her death.Hrnchiar posted that Pootoogook’s death “could be a suicide, accidental, she got drunk and fell in the river and drowned, who knows.” He also wrote that” much of the Aboriginal population in Canada is just satisfied being alcohol or drug abusers.”Annie Pootoogook in 2012. APTN/FileIn court Hrnchiar faced the public gallery and apologized.“I want to apologize to everyone sincerely for my actions,” he said, including the ‘Aboriginal’ community. “I am sorry for the hurt I caused.”The Ottawa police service called the comments “inappropriate” and “racist.”The force is seeking a demotion in rank, from Sgt to First Class Constable for a period of three months and multicultural training.The judgment is held over and a decision will be released in a written statement on Dec. 7.news@aptn.calast_img read more

Nova Scotia court dismisses Victoria Henneberry appeal

first_imgAPTN National NewsVictoria Henneberry had her second-degree murder conviction appeal dismissed by the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal Thursday.Henneberry argued she panicked when she pleaded guilty to murdering Loretta Saunders two years ago.Saunders, an Inuk woman, was murdered inside her Halifax apartment in February 2014. Her body was later found along a highway in New Brunswick.Henneberry was arrested later in Ontario with her boyfriend, and accomplice, Blake Leggette, who pleaded guilty to first-degree murder.See related stories here: Loretta Saunders More to come …last_img

Northern Native Womens organization offers services outside of the MMIW inquiry

first_imgCharlotte Morritt-JacobsAPTN National NewsMany organizations across the country have voiced their frustration over the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.The north is no exception.In the Northwest Territories, one grassroots organization is launching resources for families looking for answers and healing.“The coordinator of the family information liaison unit will work with families to help them get families the information about the police investigation, coroners reports and court reports,” said Marie Speakmen, liaison coordinator.  “As family information liaison I will help families access counselling services.”cmorrittjacobs@aptn.calast_img

Lisa Bigjohn ready to tell her sisters story again

first_imgChris StewartAPTN News SundayIt’s been 17 years since Lisa Bigjohn lost her sister – and she’s getting to tell her story — again, this time to the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. She’s spent that time coping with the loss and raising awareness about missing and murdered Indigenous women.It’s been a tough slog.“It’s just very hard some days,” Bigjohn said of the daily fight to stay strong.“I try not to think about it – how she was murdered and how she must have been begging for her life.”Her sister Mona Lee Wilson was murdered by serial killer Robert Pickton of B.C. In fact, Wilson was his last victim before he was captured and convicted of killing six women, although he was suspected of the murders of more than 20.To keep the memory of her sister alive, Bigjohn testified in 2013 at a Special Committee on Violence Against Indigenous Women in Canada in Vancouver.She says it wasn’t a good experience.“I was one of the families that was pushed aside,” she said. “Nothing came of it.”The final report of that committee, struck by the Harper government, was criticized as being inadequate and ignoring the recommendations from victims – including calls for a national inquiry.It left a bad taste in the mouths of many families who went to Ottawa to testify – including Bigjohn’s.Now, she’s putting that disappointment aside and preparing to testify again – this time before the national inquiry when it starts in Edmonton the week of Nov. 6.“I’m going to do what I have to do because I’m sick and tired of being ignored.”Bigjohn’s daughter, Susan Robinson, will be at her side – just like she was in 2013.“I just want the next time for people to be treated equally,” Robinson said. “I would like my mom not to be judged, considering what my Auntie Mona went through.“It put a lot on my mom, and I don’t want her to experience that again.”Contact Chris here: cstewart@aptn.calast_img read more

Quebec leaders divided on future of Indigenous affairs

first_img(Geoffrey Kelley, Quebec minister responsible for native affairs)Danielle Rochette APTN NewsGeoffrey Kelley, Quebec minister responsible for native affairs, thinks it’s time that the provincial government creates a new, bolstered ministry of Indigenous affairs.Currently, the Secretariat aux affaires autochtones (SAA) is the body responsible for overseeing the relationship between Indigenous people and the Quebec government.For 35 years, this entity has worked with Quebec First Nations and Inuit to facilitate access to programs and services.But, with the spotlight on the relationship between the Quebec government and Indigenous peoples, Kelley says the province needs to overhaul the SAA and pump more funding into a new Indigenous ministry.“The Quebec government is going to have to make sure that it has resources and the structures necessary to respond,” says Kelley, who’s not running for reelection Oct. 1.But Ghislain Picard, regional chief of the Assembly of First Nations for Quebec and Labrador, was surprised by the minister’s comments.“That suggestion that Quebec would be better served by a ministry of Indigenous affairs just does not hold water as long as I am concerned because it is very much paternalistic and it is like turning back the clock,” Picard says.He suggests a government-to-government model similar to Ontario’s ministry of Indigenous relations and reconciliation, which oversees the relationship between Ontario and Indigenous governments.“Our peoples have the capacity and are in the position to be speaking for themselves,” he says.last_img read more

Man accused of killing Christine Wood testifies she came at him with

first_imgLast Thursday, court also heard from a detective who conducted forensic examinations on a computer seized from Overby’s home.Jason Joseph testified he was able to go through the computer’s hard drive and forwarded the information to homicide investigators.He said one image was found and investigators asked him to locate other similar images.Three photos showing Wood and Overby together in his home were entered into evidence earlier this week.In a police video shown on the opening day of the trial, Overby denied knowing Wood when police questioned him about her.Joseph located the three photos but testified the originals were not found on the computer.“I suspect it was deleted… it is my opinion it was deleted off the original device,” said Joseph.(Christine Wood and Brett Overby. Court Exhibit)Court has previously heard crown prosecutors believe Wood used Overby’s cellphone on the night she disappeared.That particular device has never been found.Joseph testified forensic evidence proved the pictures were taken on a cellphone but he could not confirm when they were taken.The photos are undated and information about where they came from has yet to be disclosed. Court exhibit)It appears the clothing Wood is wearing is the same clothing her parents last saw her in.Both Melinda and George Wood testified Christine bought a green bandeau top, a navy lacy top and dark denim shorts on the day she disappeared.The trial is expected to run until May 17.news@aptn.ca@aptnnews-with files from The Canadian Press The house in Winnipeg where police believe Christine Wood was killed. Court exhibitAPTN NewsThe man accused of killing Christine Wood in Manitoba says he blacked out before realizing she was dead on his basement floor.Brett Overby, 32, has pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder in the death of 21-year-old Wood.Wood had travelled to Winnipeg from Oxford House First Nation in northern Manitoba in the summer of 2016.She was staying with her parents in a hotel and Crown prosecutors argue Wood met Overby through the online dating site PlentyofFish.Her body was found nearly a year later in a ditch outside the city.Overby has testified that Wood was pressuring him to have sex without a condom and came at him with a knife.He told a jury that she somehow ended up in a pool of blood on the floor and he never intended to hurt or kill her.Court previously heard that two messages sent from Wood’s Facebook account led them to Overby’s home in January 2017.Thomas Guenther, one of the detectives assigned to Wood’s case, testified on Wednesday police were eventually able to determine only one device,  believed to be Overby’s cellphone, was connected to his WIFI on the night in question.Police were able to trace the IP address used as one belonging to Overby.(Christine Wood in an undated photo)The former common-law partner of the man accused of killing Christine Wood told a Winnipeg courtroom last week he asked her to lie to police for him.Shirley Houle says she received text messages from Overby asking her to say she didn’t know anything about his online dating account.Houle was questioned by police on Feb. 1, 2017, shortly after Overby became a person of interest in the case.In one part Houle wrote, “Gotta go in tomorrow morning for a video statement.”Overby responded, “Oh shit really?? Wtf? Wonder why. Im actually really nervous about this whole situation. Im getting like anxiety and shit about it..I don’t even know her.”Later in the conversation Overby wrote, “Do me a favour, u don’t know about anything i do anymore k? I DIDN’T do anything, its just im really nervous and would like them to stop bugging me.”He went on to write, “U don’t know about POF either k.”Read the complete court record of text messages: Houle Overby interactionHoule says the couple were together almost 10 years before they broke up in March 2016.The Crown argued Wood went to Overby’s home on Aug. 19, 2016 and that was the last place she was alive.Wood was visiting Winnipeg from her home community of Bunibonibee Cree Nation when she went missing.Her parents last saw her at a hotel. She told them she was going to meet up with friends.Two days later they filed a missing persons report with Winnipeg police.Police executed a search of Overby’s house on Mar. 22, 2017 where he was arrested. He was later charged on Apr. 7.last_img read more

Equifax to update Canadians this week still mum on number impacted by

first_imgTORONTO – Equifax Canada said Monday it plans to provide an update this week on the impact of its massive data breach — nearly two months after it was first discovered — but would not say how many individuals north of the border may have had their personal information compromised.The credit data company told The Canadian Press that it is working with Canada’s privacy watchdog, which announced an investigation into the cyberattack on Friday.“We intend to share an update with Canadians this week that will include how we intend to notify any potentially impacted individuals,” an Equifax Canada spokesperson said in an email. “Our investigation is ongoing and we are committed to sharing an update with Canadian consumers.”Canada’s privacy commissioner said Friday that Equifax has committed to contacting Canadians whose data may be at risk, in writing, as soon as possible, and to provide them with free credit monitoring, a service that was offered to U.S. residents on Sept. 7, the day it first announced the data breach.The company is now facing investigations in both Canada and the U.S., but lawyers say the punitive threat by regulators is stronger south of the border.Equifax, which collects data about consumers’ credit histories and provides credit checks to a variety of companies, has been tight-lipped about the security issue’s impact in Canada.Equifax Canada did not respond to questions about the number of Canadians who may have had their personal information stolen or whether the potential fallout is limited to Canadians with credit files in the U.S.The credit monitoring company’s call centre staff have told callers that only Canadians that have dealings in the U.S. were likely to be impacted by the data breach. However, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner said on Friday that, at this point, it is not clear that the affected data was limited to those Canadians.Equifax said on Sept. 7 that it suffered a massive cyberattack in the summer that may have compromised the personal data of 143 million Americans and an undisclosed number of Canadian and U.K. residents.The credit data company has since said that fewer than 400,000 U.K. individuals may have been affected in the hack that was discovered on July 29.Equifax’s Canadian website says that the personal information that may have been breached includes names, addresses and social insurance numbers.The Federal Trade Commission in the U.S. can issue hefty fines if the credit monitoring company is found to have failed to do enough to protect consumers’ data, but Canada’s privacy watchdog does not have the power to hand down fines, said Toronto-based cybersecurity and privacy lawyer Lyndsay Wasser of McMillan LLP.Instead, the privacy commissioner can make non-binding recommendations and sign an agreement urging them to comply, she added.Tamir Israel, a staff lawyer with the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic in Ottawa, pointed to the hacking of Canadian affair-seeking website Ashley Madison, which paid $1.6 million US to settle with the FTC but was not fined in Canada.However, Wasser said an application could also be made to a federal court — either by the privacy commissioner or by an individual — for a process in which a judge could award damages to those who have suffered as a result of a data breach.The company could also face punitive measures via class actions. At least two proposed class actions have been filed in Canada against Equifax in connection with the data breach.Under Canada’s Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, personal information should be protected by security safeguards that are appropriate for the sensitivity of the information, Wasser added.However, Canada’s privacy laws do not specify the measures that must be taken and even when a company has been hacked, it may still pass the “reasonableness test,” she said.“That’s the million dollar question: What is reasonable?… Even if they did comply with industry standards, it could still be found that further precaution should have been taken,” Wasser said.On Friday, Equifax said in a statement that the cyberattack occurred through a vulnerability in an open-source application framework it uses called Apache Struts. The United States Computer Readiness team detected and disclosed the vulnerability in March, and Equifax “took efforts to identify and to patch any vulnerable systems in the company’s IT infrastructure.”Meanwhile, changes to PIPEDA that would require companies to notify people in the event of a serious data breach are in the final stages, with the proposed text of the regulations out for public consultation until Oct. 2. But until those come into force, Alberta is the only province in Canada that has mandatory reporting requirements for private-sector companies.Israel said federal breach notification laws are “critical.”“There is going to be a strong internal incentive to make sure you have a very complete PR strategy before you start telling people what’s going on, but people need to know right away.”Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version misspelled Lyndsay Wasser.last_img read more

North American stock indexes finish week flat Canadian dollar up

first_imgTORONTO – North American stock indexes capped of the week on a flat note amid heightened North Korea-U.S. tensions, as the loonie strengthened against a weakening greenback.Rallying gold and materials stocks weren’t enough to lift Toronto’s S&P/TSX composite index out of the red, which dropped 0.69 of a point to 15,454.23 in a largely broad-based decline.Despite the TSX’s minor slip Friday, the commodity-heavy index has gained more than 280 points on the week.“We had a decent run,” said Michael Currie, vice-president of TD Wealth Private Investment Advice. “We’ve got to take the positives out of the week.”In New York, stock indexes finished the day uneven with little movement in either direction.The Dow Jones industrial average gave back 9.64 points to 22,349.59, while the S&P 500 index edged up 1.62 points to 2,502.22 and the Nasdaq composite index added 4.23 points to 6,426.92.The small trades on Wall Street suggested investors were shrugging off the latest wave of ramped-up tensions between the U.S. and North Korea, said Erik Davidson, chief investment officer for Wells Fargo Private Bank.He also noted that the VIX, a measure of how much volatility investors expect in stocks, was little changed.Geopolitical tensions ratcheted up after President Donald Trump authorized stiffer sanctions in response to North Korea’s nuclear weapons advances, drawing a furious response from Pyongyang. Trump expanded the Treasury Department’s ability to target anyone conducting significant trade in goods, services or technology with North Korea, and to ban them from interacting with the U.S. financial system.North Korean leader Kim Jong Un retaliated by calling Trump “deranged” and saying he’ll “pay dearly” for his threats.In currency markets, the Canadian dollar was trading at an average price of 81.19 cents US, up 0.15 of a cent.On the commodities front, the November crude contract added 11 cents at US$50.66 per barrel and the October natural gas contract was up one cent to US$2.96 per mmBTU.The December gold contract advanced $2.70 to US$1,297.50 an ounce and the December copper contract was up one cent at US$2.94 a pound.– With files from The Associated Press.Follow @DaveHTO on Twitter.last_img read more

Saskatchewans climatechange plan includes buying carbon offsets no carbon tax

first_imgREGINA – The Saskatchewan government has introduced a climate-change strategy that inches toward a price on carbon emissions, but leaves large parts of its economy untouched.And it doesn’t include a carbon tax, which Environment Minister Dustin Duncan was happy to point out Monday.“I believe it will achieve as much, if not more than, a carbon tax ever would,” Duncan said after introducing the plan.It calls for performance standards on facilities that emit more than 25,000 tonnes annually of carbon dioxide equivalent. Facilities that exceed their limit will have to pay.They will be able to buy carbon offsets from farmers or foresters, a carbon credit from another company with emissions under its allotment or pay into a provincial fund.The standards are to be developed next year, Duncan said.“We want to see the economy continue to grow and, for some industries, that means that their emissions will grow. It’s not a cap-and-trade program where we’re capping absolutely the amount of emissions.”Duncan said standards will recognize investments companies have already made to reduce their emissions, something the energy industry has been lobbying for.The document contains no goals or targets and doesn’t include estimates of how much greenhouse gas emissions are expected to be reduced. There is an undated pledge to have SaskPower, a Crown-owned utility, generate half its electricity from renewables.“They’re going to great pains to say they’re not doing carbon pricing and then implementing a policy which, everywhere else it’s implemented, is called carbon pricing,” said University of Alberta energy economist Andrew Leach.The biggest hole in Saskatchewan’s plan is its limited scope, said Leach.“They’re not touching their transportation, home heating, commercial and industrial energy use at all with this policy.”Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec all have more inclusive plans, he said.Leach also noted the government hasn’t specified how high the emissions standards will be. Too high, he said, and carbon becomes worthless and few emissions will be cut.Federal Environment Minister Catherine McKenna said the plan is a good step toward carbon pricing.“Saskatchewan’s new plan proposes a performance standard for heavy industry that includes a carbon market. Momentum for carbon pricing is growing.”But she said it will have to be wider to satisfy Ottawa.“Based on what’s in today’s plan, Saskatchewan’s price likely wouldn’t hit our standard, because it applies only to heavy industry instead of being economy-wide.”Brad Herald of the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers welcomed Saskatchewan’s plan.“There’s a great range of compliance options for us there.”He declined to say whether Saskatchewan’s plan is more favourable to industry than Alberta’s, which includes a carbon tax.“Both are legitimate,” he said.The Agricultural Producers of Saskatchewan also praised the plan. It leaves agriculture, the source of about one-quarter of the province’s emissions, largely exempt.“We also strongly reject the imposition of a carbon tax on our sector,” said association president Todd Lewis.Erin Flanagan of the Pembina Institute, a clean energy think-tank, said Saskatchewan’s plan is an improvement over previous positions.“It’s still not a credible approach to climate change,” she said. “They are last to the party, but it’s good they are moving forward with some pieces of an approach.”Flanagan said it’s tough to know how much difference the plan will make.“The fact they haven’t said what these (carbon) prices will be makes it difficult to know what kind of impact this is going to have. Saskatchewan doesn’t have an economy-wide (reduction) target.Saskatchewan has remained opposed to the federal government’s insistence that all provinces must have a price on carbon in place by 2018.Duncan said Monday’s plan doesn’t change that.“We’re prepared to defend our position. If that means go to court, so be it.”— By Bob Weber in Edmonton. Follow him on Twitter at @row1960last_img read more