Tag: 上海夜色论坛

Did Amitabh Bachchan sense trouble minutes before Vivek Oberoi tweeted about Aishwarya

first_imgAmitabh Bachchan and Vivek OberoiInstagram/Varinder ChawlaVivek Oberoi made headlines recently for his “insulting” tweet involving Aishwarya Rai Bachchan. But just some time before the controversial tweet, the actress’ father-in-law Amitabh Bachchan made an advisory tweet that goes perfectly for Vivek.Vivek tweeted out a meme that involved him, Salman Khan and Abhishek Bachchan with Aishwarya. The tweet did not go down well with majority of people, who trolled and lambasted the actor on social media.The concerned meme involved three pictures of Aishwarya – one with Salman, one with Vivek and the last one with Abhishek, referred to as “opinion polls”, “exit polls” and “results” respectively. This co-incidence came to notice of a lot of people, who were surprised to see the veteran actor making this tweet just some minutes before Vivek created the controversy. While some called it a mere co-incidence, some felt it to be Amitabh’s strong “sixth sense”.”Must say that AB’s tweets have prophetic tendencies. He had put out a tweet shortly before Sridevi’s death, and this tweet was put at 12:07 pm & at 1:23 pm Vivek Oberoi tweeted about Aishwarya Rai, Salman Khan & Abhishek Bachchan,” one person replied to Amitabh’s tweet. A lot of people agreed to it as well.It is to be mentioned, something similar had happened before Sridevi’s death. Just a few hours before the news of Sridevi’s death had broken, he had made a tweet that many felt was a premonition from the megastar.Just a few hours before Sridevi’s demise, Amitabh had made a tweet expressing a sense of unease. While Vivek eventually deleted his tweet and apologised for it as well, he might have refrained himself from making this tweet if he had seen Big B’s advice. Just some time before Vivek made the tweet, Amitabh  tweeted advising people to be careful with their posts on social media.”Social media par soch samajh kar zikr karo, ae-dost, kahin saamajik aitabaar se gair munaasib na ho,” his tweet in Hindi read.last_img read more

WhatsApp cofounder Brian Acton to leave company

first_imgBrian Acton, co-founder of WhatsApp (L) and Jan Koum, co-founder and CEO of WhatsApp speak at the WSJD Live conference in Laguna Beach, California October 25, 2016.REUTERS/Mike Blake(Reuters) – Brian Acton, co-founder of WhatsApp, now owned by Facebook Inc, will leave the messaging service company to start a new foundation, he said in a Facebook post on Tuesday.Acton spent eight years with WhatsApp, which Facebook bought in 2014 for $19 billion in cash and stock.A Stanford alumnus, Acton co-founded WhatsApp with Ukrainian immigrant Jan Koum in 2009. The duo worked at Yahoo before starting WhatsApp.last_img

Bobby Hajjaj quits DNCC mayoral race

first_imgBobby HajjajFive mayoral contenders will contest the by-polls to Dhaka North City Corporation (DNCC) after Jatiya Ganotantrik Andolan candidate Bobby Hajjaj quit the electoral race.Hajjaj withdrew his candidature within the stipulated time that expired on Saturday, said returning officer Abul Kashem.The remaining candidates are – Awami League’s Atiqul Islam, Jatiya Party’s Shafin Ahmed, NPP’s Anisur Rahman Dewan, PDP’s Shahin Khan and independent contender Mohammad Abdur Rahim.The by-elections to the vacant mayoral post will be held on 28 February.Besides, by-polls to councillor posts of 36 new wards – 18 in DNCC and as many in Dhaka South City Corporation – will be held on the same day.last_img

DC Orgs Step Up to Fight Breast Cancer

first_imgIf you’re a woman of a certain age living in the District and receiving Medicaid benefits, don’t be surprised if AmeriHealth Caritas District of Columbia reminds you that it’s time for a mammogram.AmeriHealth, one of four Medicaid-managed care organizations, is ratcheting up its efforts to ensure all women due — or overdue — for a mammogram undergo breast-cancer screenings, Keith Maccannon, director of marketing, community relations and outreach for AmeriHealth Caritas in the District, told the AFRO.Victorianne Russell Walton is a breast cancer survivor and founder of It’s in the Genes. (Courtesy photo)One of the ways AmeriHealth reaches out to those women is by partnering with It’s In the Genes, a nonprofit, breast-cancer advocacy group based in Southwest D.C., to hold “PINKIE” parties at all of the major hospitals in the District and surrounding areas. PINKIE stands for “Purposely Involved N Keeping Individuals Educated.” At the events women chat with breast cancer survivors and get mammograms in a fun, festive environment complete with spa services, a deejay, swag bags and more.“Even though they know they’re due for a mammogram, they may need a little extra support to go out and get that done,” Maccannon said of women.Typically, between 25 and 35 women at the parties get mammograms on the spot, Maccannon said. If the women don’t want them done at the parties, they can sign up to get one at another time for free or at a reduced price. According to costhelper.com, a privately-held Internet startup located in Silicon Valley that provides consumer information about thousands of goods and services, the average cost of a mammogram is about $102. As part of its ongoing outreach, AmeriHealth plans to hold more “PINKIE” parties this year. AmeriHealth is focused on getting women aged 40 and above in for mammograms. Women between ages 50 and 54 are supposed to get mammograms annually, while women 55 and above should have them every two years, MacCannon said. “Our goal as a managed care organization is to make sure that all of the members enrolled in our plan get those screenings and those healthcare exams that they are supposed to get according to their age and gender,” Maccannon said.Mammograms, which allow doctors to help see when there’s a change in the breast can be a powerful tool in the fight against breast cancer. Besides the PINKIE parties, AmeriHealth also gets the word out about mammograms by way of phone calls, targeted mailings, automated phone reminders, text messages, the George Washington University Mobile Mammography Van, and sponsorships from local groups that emphasize the importance of mammograms.In 2016, AmeriHealth Caritas District of Columbia had roughly 4,047 members meeting the criteria for a breast cancer screening exam, MacCannon said. Of those members, AmeriHealth’s outreach efforts led to nearly 63 percent of them getting the exam in 2017, he said. The District appears to be ground zero for breast cancer. Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that the District has the eighth highest mortality rate from breast cancer in the U.S. Nationwide, Black women are also most likely to die from the disease than any other group, statistics show. Victorianne Russell Walton, 52, founder of It’s in the Genes, is a breast cancer survivor who had health insurance at the time of her 2007 diagnosis. She alleges that in her case, her doctor was at fault for misdiagnosing her four times. “If you can’t trust your doctor and if your doctor of years is misdiagnosing you, who can you trust?” Walton asked.She was convinced she had breast cancer because it ran in her family, so she kept persisting. “They didn’t analyze the tumor, they were analyzing fatty tissue,” Walton said. “Each time they said, ‘It’s benign.’ I said, ‘No, it’s not.’”She was up against a doctor who initially thought her health problems had to do with her being an overweight Black woman who ate a lot of salt. Walton said she cut back her salt intake years before. She declined to name the doctor, citing ongoing litigation. “We have these stereotypes against us before we even walk in the room. I think it’s a form of same old, same old,” she said.By the time Walton was finally diagnosed in May 2007, she had a 50 percent chance of living. Today, she encourages women to be just as pushy as she was with her doctor. They should also take the initiative and get their scheduled mammograms“Superman is not coming; Superwoman is not coming,” Walton said.last_img read more

I Want My Cell TV

first_img This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. February 1, 2006 2 min read When Steve Jobs unveiled Apple’s video iPod, the biggest names in media moguldom started scrambling to get their shows on the tiny screen. A half-million cell phone owners were already tuned in to MobiTVand Verizon Wireless’ VCast. But Jobs’ announcement catapulted video podcasting into prime time.Within weeks of the debut, Apple iTunes had sold a million episodes of popular TV shows at two bucks a throw. Suddenly, it’s hip to watch TV on a 2- to 3-inch display. Better yet, video podcasting–or vodcasting–is a marketing medium any entrepreneur can afford.Vodcasts can be made with any videocam or even some cell phones and can be shared through a growing list of free or low-cost distributors. For example, the nonprofit Open Media Network offers free distribution, while MPEG Nation charges just $5 to host a video for six months. Sites like FilmLoop and Pic2Vid let you build a video using digital pictures and a voice-over. You have to use their players for clip creation and digital rights management, but videos are easily reproduced for different communities.Web-savvy ad agencies like Los Angeles-based IndieClick can help produce your videos and find the right audience. A video marketing campaign might not only be low-budget–it might even be self-supporting, says IndieClick President Heather Luttrell. Distributors like Revver have ways to track viewers and will share the revenue from ads that get displayed at the end of clips or as small, transparent overlays.”We might start by spending $1,000 this month on three different podcasting initiatives and generate $1,100 in revenue,” explains Luttrell. “We see what works and then target the highest revenue-generating venues.”Who’s watching? Basically, your kids and millions of other cell phone-packing young folk already dialed into text messaging, blogging, online gaming and, of course, MTV. You need a message that plays in those venues. If you have one, it can really work for you: One recent IndieClick vodcast garnered 1 million downloads.Youth market not on your radar? Don’t worry, says Luttrell: Distribution networks and audiences will broaden to other demographics over time. This story appears in the February 2006 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe » Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more