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10 months agoMinotti warns Cagliari midfielder Nicolo Barella against Chelsea move

first_imgMinotti warns Cagliari midfielder Nicolo Barella against Chelsea moveby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer Italy international Lorenzo Minotti has warned Cagliari midfielder Nicolo Barella against a move to Chelsea.Minotti, who used to play for Cagliari, has questioned whether Barella would get a game with the Blues.He told TMW: “Risk of a [Marco] Verratti-situation? The Premier [League] is a competitive championship.”Now the Italian teams are not ready to spend a similar amount, and those with chances [to] have [full squads].”If he goes to Chelsea he will struggle to find a starting shirt and be ready for the national team.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

Ottawa police officer Chris Hrnchiar pleads guilty to discreditable conduct

first_imgAPTN National NewsOttawa police sergeant Chris Hrnchiar pleaded guilty to two counts of discreditable conduct in court Tuesday and apologized for his actions.The charges followed an investigation by the professional standards section of the Ottawa police service that found Hrnchiar wrote racist and disparaging comments about Indigenous people after the death of Inuk artist Annie Pootoogook.Pootoogook’s body was found in the Rideau river outside downtown Ottawa Sept. 19.See related stories here: Annie PootoogookThe comments were posted by Hrnchiar through Facebook in response to an Ottawa Citizen story about her death.Hrnchiar posted that Pootoogook’s death “could be a suicide, accidental, she got drunk and fell in the river and drowned, who knows.” He also wrote that” much of the Aboriginal population in Canada is just satisfied being alcohol or drug abusers.”Annie Pootoogook in 2012. APTN/FileIn court Hrnchiar faced the public gallery and apologized.“I want to apologize to everyone sincerely for my actions,” he said, including the ‘Aboriginal’ community. “I am sorry for the hurt I caused.”The Ottawa police service called the comments “inappropriate” and “racist.”The force is seeking a demotion in rank, from Sgt to First Class Constable for a period of three months and multicultural training.The judgment is held over and a decision will be released in a written statement on Dec. 7.news@aptn.calast_img read more

Northern Native Womens organization offers services outside of the MMIW inquiry

first_imgCharlotte Morritt-JacobsAPTN National NewsMany organizations across the country have voiced their frustration over the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.The north is no exception.In the Northwest Territories, one grassroots organization is launching resources for families looking for answers and healing.“The coordinator of the family information liaison unit will work with families to help them get families the information about the police investigation, coroners reports and court reports,” said Marie Speakmen, liaison coordinator.  “As family information liaison I will help families access counselling services.”cmorrittjacobs@aptn.calast_img

Man accused of killing Christine Wood testifies she came at him with

first_imgLast Thursday, court also heard from a detective who conducted forensic examinations on a computer seized from Overby’s home.Jason Joseph testified he was able to go through the computer’s hard drive and forwarded the information to homicide investigators.He said one image was found and investigators asked him to locate other similar images.Three photos showing Wood and Overby together in his home were entered into evidence earlier this week.In a police video shown on the opening day of the trial, Overby denied knowing Wood when police questioned him about her.Joseph located the three photos but testified the originals were not found on the computer.“I suspect it was deleted… it is my opinion it was deleted off the original device,” said Joseph.(Christine Wood and Brett Overby. Court Exhibit)Court has previously heard crown prosecutors believe Wood used Overby’s cellphone on the night she disappeared.That particular device has never been found.Joseph testified forensic evidence proved the pictures were taken on a cellphone but he could not confirm when they were taken.The photos are undated and information about where they came from has yet to be disclosed. Court exhibit)It appears the clothing Wood is wearing is the same clothing her parents last saw her in.Both Melinda and George Wood testified Christine bought a green bandeau top, a navy lacy top and dark denim shorts on the day she disappeared.The trial is expected to run until May 17.news@aptn.ca@aptnnews-with files from The Canadian Press The house in Winnipeg where police believe Christine Wood was killed. Court exhibitAPTN NewsThe man accused of killing Christine Wood in Manitoba says he blacked out before realizing she was dead on his basement floor.Brett Overby, 32, has pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder in the death of 21-year-old Wood.Wood had travelled to Winnipeg from Oxford House First Nation in northern Manitoba in the summer of 2016.She was staying with her parents in a hotel and Crown prosecutors argue Wood met Overby through the online dating site PlentyofFish.Her body was found nearly a year later in a ditch outside the city.Overby has testified that Wood was pressuring him to have sex without a condom and came at him with a knife.He told a jury that she somehow ended up in a pool of blood on the floor and he never intended to hurt or kill her.Court previously heard that two messages sent from Wood’s Facebook account led them to Overby’s home in January 2017.Thomas Guenther, one of the detectives assigned to Wood’s case, testified on Wednesday police were eventually able to determine only one device,  believed to be Overby’s cellphone, was connected to his WIFI on the night in question.Police were able to trace the IP address used as one belonging to Overby.(Christine Wood in an undated photo)The former common-law partner of the man accused of killing Christine Wood told a Winnipeg courtroom last week he asked her to lie to police for him.Shirley Houle says she received text messages from Overby asking her to say she didn’t know anything about his online dating account.Houle was questioned by police on Feb. 1, 2017, shortly after Overby became a person of interest in the case.In one part Houle wrote, “Gotta go in tomorrow morning for a video statement.”Overby responded, “Oh shit really?? Wtf? Wonder why. Im actually really nervous about this whole situation. Im getting like anxiety and shit about it..I don’t even know her.”Later in the conversation Overby wrote, “Do me a favour, u don’t know about anything i do anymore k? I DIDN’T do anything, its just im really nervous and would like them to stop bugging me.”He went on to write, “U don’t know about POF either k.”Read the complete court record of text messages: Houle Overby interactionHoule says the couple were together almost 10 years before they broke up in March 2016.The Crown argued Wood went to Overby’s home on Aug. 19, 2016 and that was the last place she was alive.Wood was visiting Winnipeg from her home community of Bunibonibee Cree Nation when she went missing.Her parents last saw her at a hotel. She told them she was going to meet up with friends.Two days later they filed a missing persons report with Winnipeg police.Police executed a search of Overby’s house on Mar. 22, 2017 where he was arrested. He was later charged on Apr. 7.last_img read more

Inspector warned duck boat company of design flaws last year

first_imgA private inspector said Saturday that he warned the company operating duck boats on a Missouri lake about design flaws putting the watercraft at greater risk of sinking, less than a year before the accident that killed 17 people during a sudden storm.Steve Paul, owner of the Test Drive Technologies inspection service in the St. Louis area, said he issued a written report for the company in August 2017. It explained why the boats’ engines — and pumps that remove water from their hulls — might fail in inclement weather.He also told The Associated Press that the tourist boats’ canopies make them hard to escape when they sink — a concern raised by regulators after a similar sinking in Arkansas killed 13 people in 1999.The accident Thursday evening on Table Rock Lake outside the tourist town of Branson also is raising questions about whether storm warnings in the area went unheeded and whether any agency can keep boaters off the water when inclement weather approaches.“If you have the information that you could have rough waters or a storm coming, why ever put a boat on that water?” Paul said.A witness’ video of the duck boat just before it capsized suggests that its flexible plastic windows might have been closed and could have trapped passengers as the hybrid boat-truck went down. It does not show passengers jumping clear.“The biggest problem with a duck when it sinks is that canopy,” Paul said. “That canopy becomes what I’ll call a people catcher, and people can’t get out from under that canopy.”A spokeswoman for Ripley Entertainment, the company operating the duck boats in Branson, did not respond Saturday to telephone and email messages seeking comment. Spokeswoman Suzanne Smagala has noted that Thursday’s accident was the only one in more than 40 years of operation.An archived version of Ripley’s website said it operates 20 duck boats in Branson and described them as “built from the ground up under United States Coast Guard (USCG) supervision with the latest in marine safety.”In central Wisconsin, Original Wisconsin Ducks in the Dells has no plans to change how it operates after 73 years of safe rides, general manager Dan Gavinski said. But his company operates World War II-vintage boats, not the modified modern version.Since 1999, duck boats have been linked to the deaths of more than 40 people, with a troubled safety record on the road and water alike. Their height can obscure cars, pedestrians or bicycles from a driver’s view, and maintenance problems can be severe.Paul said he won’t know until the boat that sank is recovered from the lake whether it’s one of the two dozen he inspected for Ripley Entertainment in August 2017.The U.S. Coast Guard said the boat that sank was built in 1944 and had passed an inspection in February, The Kansas City Star reported . But Paul said the boat would have been heavily modified to make it longer so that only part of it dates to World War II. He said it would still have the design flaw he identified in his report.He declined to share a copy of his report with The Associated Press but said he said he is willing to make it available to authorities.“I’m sure eventually it will be subpoenaed,” he said.Paul said the duck boats he inspected — which the company had just purchased or repaired — vented exhaust from the motor out front and below the water line. He said in rough conditions, water could get into the exhaust system, and then into the motor, cutting it off. With the motor off, he said, its pump for removing water from the hull would not operate.“If you watch that video, that water is definitely being slammed up into that exhaust without a doubt,” Paul said.After the deadly sinking in Arkansas in 1999, the National Transportation Safety Board recommended doing away with the canopies and adding more floatation capacity so duck boats could remain upright and keep floating even if they took on water.The industry took little heed, said Robert Mongeluzzi, a Philadelphia attorney who has represented victims of duck boat crashes. The canopies can protect customers from rain or sun, he noted, and closed windows allow companies to heat the cabins, extending operating hours.The NTSB called the industry’s response to the recommendations disappointing, saying companies cited the cost of engineering and installing additional flotation capacity as prohibitive.“The duck boat is notoriously unstable and unsuited for what they were attempting to do with it,” said Daniel Rose, an attorney whose New York-based law firm has represented victims in several accidents. “It tries to be a boat and a car and does neither, really, except under ideal circumstances.”State officials said the Coast Guard regulates such craft; its officials did not immediately respond to requests for more information. Spokesmen said the Department of Transportation doesn’t regulate duck boats because they’re amphibious, and the Department of Public Safety doesn’t in this case because it’s a commercial vessel, as opposed to a recreational one.It’s also not clear that any agency had the authority to keep boats off the lake. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers built it in the late 1950s, but its officials said they don’t have such authority.Witnesses have said the weather appeared calm before a storm suddenly whipped up strong waves and spray.But nearly eight hours earlier, the National Weather Service had issued a severe thunderstorm watch for the western and central Missouri counties.A severe thunderstorm warning that went out at 6:32 p.m. specifically mentioned Table Rock Lake. The first emergency calls over the accident occurred just after 7 p.m.Meteorologist Elisa Raffa of KOLR-TV in Springfield said in a phone interview Saturday that her station was forecasting the threat of severe weather all morning.“This storm didn’t come out of nowhere,” she said. “That is what pains me. I feel like we did everything, at least we tried to do everything, by the book as meteorologists and we still had this horrible tragedy on our hands.”___Hanna reported from Topeka, Kansas. Johnson reported from Seattle. Jim Salter in St. Louis; Denise Lavoie in Richmond, Virginia; Roxana Hegeman in Wichita, Kansas, and James MacPherson in Bismarck, North Dakota, contributed.last_img read more

NFL Quarterbacks Are Leaning On The Short Pass — And Its Not

T. Taylor (BUF)38-0.5544-0.23450.42-0.37 SHORT%Z-SCORESHORT%Z-SCORESHORT%Z-SCORETOT. PASS THROWNATTEMPTSCOMP%YPATD%INT%CONV. RATE C. Wentz (PHI)35-0.9239-0.9534-1.06-2.93 D. Brees (NO)52%1.3854%1.1053%1.393.87 M. Ryan (ATL)34-0.9745-0.1041-0.09-1.17 J. Goff (LAR)40-0.1841-0.69440.26-0.60 T. Siemian (DEN)34-0.9742-0.59460.50-1.05 J. McCown (NYJ)490.97470.20460.521.69 J. Brissett (IND)460.48531.0342-0.061.45 A. Smith (KC)480.82551.32460.542.68 J. Cutler (MIA)420.02510.66561.772.45 M. Stafford (DET)40-0.22500.5437-0.70-0.38 FIRST DOWNSECOND DOWNTHIRD DOWN J. Winston (TB)30-1.6232-1.9522-2.54-6.10 Short of the sticks67273.2%6.61.2%2.4%12.5% C. Beathard (SF)501.07470.19551.652.91 B. Hundley (GB)511.24480.25470.562.05 B. Bortles (JAC)501.12480.35480.702.17 D. Prescott (DAL)36-0.8132-1.9642-0.05-2.82 C. Keenum (MIN)501.07460.02460.501.59 M. Trubisky (CHI)29-1.64531.01490.900.28 A. Dalton (CIN)39-0.43581.6636-0.760.46 E. Manning (NYG)430.12551.3440-0.221.25 C. Newton (CAR)501.0738-1.1039-0.37-0.40 C. Palmer (ARI)29-1.6346-0.0340-0.33-1.98 D. Carr (OAK)430.1145-0.12450.330.32 R. Wilson (SEA)36-0.7337-1.2738-0.52-2.52 Picture this common scene on a Sunday afternoon. Your team could really use a scoring drive to turn the tide. On a 3rd-and-10, before the quarterback is even pressured, he quickly throws a 2-yard pass, and the receiver is tackled a few yards later to bring up fourth down. The crowd grumbles, the offense casually jogs off the field and the punting unit comes on. Better luck next time.Sure, once in a blue moon the offense may throw a bubble screen on 3rd-and-33 and end up with a 52-yard touchdown, like the Rams did with Robert Woods against the Giants in Week 9 this season. But that is the rarest of exceptions.Generally, safe passes like that don’t accomplish much, and we have the data to back that up. How does that 2-yard pass on 3rd-and-10 work out? According to the ESPN Stats & Information Group, quarterback passes thrown no more than 2 yards beyond the line of scrimmage on third down with at least 10 yards to go have been converted only 10.9 percent of the time this season. On throws that travel at least 10 yards, quarterbacks have converted 38.6 percent of the time. So an offense can more than triple its conversion rate just by doing the most obvious thing when trying to move the chains: throwing the ball past the imaginary yellow line on your TV screen.And yet despite this, NFL teams are leaning on the short pass more than ever. The same league that transformed into a passing league over the past 10 years is slowing morphing into something else: the dump-off league.There are some risks with throwing deeper, of course, such as a higher interception rate. And in some special situations, getting a first down isn’t the primary goal of a drive, especially when facing third-and-long. Sometimes teams are just trying to get enough yards to make a field-goal attempt shorter. Or with a big lead in the second half, they’re hoping for an easy completion that will run some clock and gain field position.But when an offense really needs to score points, playing it safe and throwing short of the sticks on third down is often the inferior strategy. We looked at the data from ESPN Stats & Info for passes on 3rd-and-10 or longer for Weeks 1 to 13. We divided the passes between those thrown short of the sticks and those thrown at or beyond the sticks:1For reference, a 12-yard pass on 3rd-and-13 would be considered short of the sticks. Which quarterbacks are the most conservative passers?Which quarterbacks throw short of a “successful” pass distance the most relative to their peers (as measured by the z-scores — the standard deviations above/below the mean — of the Short%* for each down added together), minimum 200 dropbacks through Week 13 of the 2017 season A. Rodgers (GB)602.38520.8924-2.280.99 D. Kizer (CLE)37-0.6842-0.52440.28-0.91 D. Watson (HOU)30-1.5331-2.1340-0.26-3.92 The completion rate for short throws is more than 30 percentage points higher than the rate for longer passes and yet the conversation rate is more than 30 points lower. This is not surprising because defenses are playing to prevent the first down and are willing to concede a fraction of the yardage. However, this positioning make it very difficult for a team to throw short and run after the catch to convert.So far we have only talked about third downs, the crucial down for maintaining offensive success. However, analyzing aggressive and conservative passing on first and second down is also important. A bubble screen that loses a few yards to bring up 2nd-and-13 is also putting the offense in a position to fail.Football Outsiders’ key efficiency metrics, including Defense-adjusted Value Over Average (explained here), are built around the concept of successful plays and are adjusted for factors like the down and distance. For instance, a 5-yard pass on 3rd-and-3 is more valuable than a 5-yard pass on 2nd-and-17. For a pass to be considered a successful play, it must gain at least 45 percent of the needed yards on first down, 60 percent on second down, and 100 percent on third and fourth. A completion that does not meet those standards is considered a failed completion. Joe Flacco of the Ravens set the failed completion record last season, with 144, and he leads all quarterbacks in 2017 with 95 through Week 13.It’s not just Flacco. The ineffective dump-off is happening across the NFL. Leaguewide, 26.1 percent of all completions this season qualify as failed completions. That’s the highest rate for a season in the Football Outsiders database, which goes back to 1989, and if the 2017 rate stays at that level, it will break the current high bar set in 2015 (25.1 percent).This is not to say that the short pass doesn’t have value in the NFL playbook or that every quarterback should begin slinging the ball 25 yards downfield each time he takes a snap. There is no one right way to run an NFL offense, and some teams have been able to use the short pass to devastating effect. To get a better sense of this, let’s look at which quarterbacks throw short most often using air yards stats.2This includes passes that drew a defensive pass interference flag but excludes passes that were intentionally thrown away or became intentional grounding penalties.Football Outsiders has a stat called “Short%” to denote the percentage of attempts that a quarterback threw short of the minimum yards needed for a successful play, as defined above. So if 45 percent of needed yards are required on first downs, then anything shorter than a 5-yard throw on first-and-10 would be considered a short pass here. The league average for Short% in 2017 is 41.6 percent on first down, 45.5 percent on second down, and 42.5 percent on third down. It’s not until fourth down that most quarterbacks realize the importance of needing to convert with a big throw. Short% on fourth down is 26.2 percent (although that is only on a sample of 214 plays).We looked at Short% on first, second and third downs for quarterbacks who have had a minimum of 200 dropbacks this season. For the 35 quarterbacks, we took the z-score (standard deviations above or below average) of each percentage and added them up, to make sure we were accurately capturing quarterbacks who threw short on all of their downs relative to the league. The quarterback with the largest summed z-score in the table below is the most conservative, as a higher percentage of his passes were short of being a successful play. J. Flacco (BAL)480.79551.28511.123.19 B. Hoyer (SF/NE)450.42551.27490.902.59 B. Roethlisberger (PIT)470.6838-1.1136-0.75-1.19 Short passes become puntsKey outcomes for passes on 3rd-and-10 or longer, Weeks 1-13 Source: ESPN Stats & Information Group P. Rivers (LAC)440.30510.67450.321.29 T. Savage (HOU)38-0.4742-0.5530-1.57-2.59 T. Brady (NE)36-0.7942-0.5434-1.06-2.40 K. Cousins (WAS)470.70460.03501.051.78 M. Mariota (TEN)37-0.64460.0433-1.10-1.70 At or beyond the sticks39042.89.64.43.842.6 Higher z-scores mean a quarterback throws short more often.*Short% is the share of passes that fall short of a successful play’s distance (at least 45 percent of the needed yards on first down, 60 percent on second down, and 100 percent on third)Source: Football Outsiders Some of the names at the top of the list are predictable, including Flacco and infamous short pass maestro Alex Smith. Jay Cutler has been very dink-and-dunk oriented with Adam Gase in Miami this season, while San Francisco’s first two quarterbacks this season (Brian Hoyer and C.J. Beathard) made the top five.The real surprise here is the name at the very top: Drew Brees. Not only does he rank as the most conservative passer, but he has consistently stuck to this strategy no matter what the down is. To his credit, Brees has made it work — the Saints rank No. 1 in offensive DVOA and No. 6 in passing. Perhaps more accurately, the running backs are making this offense work. Through Week 13, rookie Alvin Kamara ranked as the best receiving running back while teammate Mark Ingram ranks as Football Outsiders’ top rusher. With two RBs capable of big gains on any play, it’s no surprise that Brees is throwing short early and often. We’ll see if this strategy can sustain itself — the Saints have failed to score 21 points in all four of their losses this season (each was to a playoff contender, including last night’s loss to Atlanta).At the bottom, seven quarterbacks had a combined z-score below 2.0 standard deviations. That includes the trio of favorites for the MVP race in Tom Brady, Russell Wilson and Carson Wentz, whose aggressive styles this year have been a positive for their offenses. Similar things could have been said about Deshaun Watson before Houston’s standout rookie tore his ACL.But being aggressive is not a magic formula for success as the list plainly shows. Watson’s backup, Tom Savage, has tried to emulate Watson’s aggressive style, but without anywhere near the same success. Likewise, Jameis Winston of the Buccaneers is routinely one of the leaders in air yards per attempt, but his lack of consistency remains a problem for Tampa Bay. In Dallas, Dak Prescott is throwing aggressively, but his receivers are getting the fewest yards per carry after the catch in the league.Like with any stat, Short% is only one piece of the puzzle, and every quarterback has his own set of circumstances. As we see with Brees, a quarterback can get away with passive play if he’s extremely efficient and the team is still winning.Few quarterbacks have this type of arsenal or this type of ability, so they would be better served trusting the numbers and resisting the easy dump-off.Check out our latest NFL predictions. read more

Framing the best Ohio State sports moments of 201213

Fans of Ohio State sports are lucky, spoiled even, you could say. Not only is Columbus home to one of the country’s best football programs with Urban Meyer at the helm, but the basketball team, under the watch of Thad Matta, has developed into a national power. Over the last five years, OSU leads all schools in the two-sport winning percentage of football and men’s basketball. The past academic year witnessed a flawed but driven football team go undefeated and a basketball squad, having to replace a two-time all-American and the program’s third all-time leading scorer, come within a game of matching its NCAA Tournament run from a season ago. As the photo editor of The Lantern, I was privileged to witness each of OSU’s 12 football games in person. I also covered the majority of the basketball team’s contests, including all of the Big Ten Tournament in Chicago and the NCAA Tournament games in Dayton and Los Angeles. Here’s the best that was on the gridiron and the hardwood in 2012-13 at OSU: Best game: OSU 73, Arizona 70, NCAA Tournament Sweet 16 Playing in one of America’s basketball cathedrals, OSU advanced to its second Elite Eight in as many seasons at the Staples Center in Los Angeles. The No. 6-seeded Wildcats, coached by Sean Miller, Matta’s former assistant at Xavier, raced out to a 26-17 lead. Junior forward Deshaun Thomas hit a couple 3-pointers to help the Buckeyes claw back to within four points at halftime. Out of the break, No. 2 seed OSU used a 10-2 run to take hold of the contest. The Buckeyes lead got as high as eight points with 7:42 to play, but an and-one layup from senior guard Mark Lyons tied the game at 70-70 with 21 seconds remaining. With the ball in his hands less than a week after hitting the game-winner in a third round contest against Iowa State, junior guard Aaron Craft passed to LaQuinton Ross with two seconds left. The sophomore forward and occupant of Kobe Bryant’s locker during the stay in L.A. hit a 3-pointer from the left arc to catapult the Buckeyes past the Wildcats. Best player: Then-sophomore quarterback Braxton Miller Thomas made a strong case for himself being the name in this category, leading the Big Ten in scoring and being OSU’s only offensive option for the most of the season. But as much as the junior forward was relied on this winter, Miller was to an even greater extent with the football team. The then-sophomore set a school record for total yards in a season and was a serious Heisman contender until the trophy’s finalists were announced in early December. In 2012, Miller totaled 3,310 yards and 28 touchdowns. With Thomas declaring himself eligible for the NBA Draft, Miller is likely to see his name in this category again next year. Best play: Craft’s game-winning 3-pointer vs. Iowa State Two plays made by players on the football team came to mind when trying to decide who would win this category. There was the scrambling run for a touchdown by Miller at Penn State that involved multiple juke moves before a leap into the end zone. And the superman-esque dive by then-sophomore linebacker Ryan Shazier into Wisconsin then-senior running back Montee Ball forced a fumble at the goal line and stopped history (Ball was a touchdown away from setting the NCAA career record). But neither of those, nor any play made by the football or basketball team this year, were better than the 3-pointer Craft hit in Dayton against Iowa State to send OSU into the Sweet 16. Dribbling the ball at the top of the key, the junior guard waved off calls for the ball by Thomas and junior guard Lenzelle Smith Jr. With Cyclone freshman forward Georges Niang isolated on him, Craft waited until there was one second left before firing a 3-pointer that found nothing but the bottom of the net. “I hope someday they put a statue in front of our building of him,” Matta said on CBS after the game. “Coaches were telling me he’s exhausted. He’s too tough to be tired. What a big-time shot.” Best moment: Then-redshirt junior quarterback Kenny Guiton leads comeback against Purdue OSU’s dream of an undefeated season nearly came to a screeching halt at the end of the third quarter of the Buckeyes’ Oct. 20 game against Purdue in Columbus. Miller had just suffered an injury, left the field on a cart and exited the stadium in an ambulance. OSU was trailing the Boilermakers, 20-14, and with its best player out, the team’s perfect 7-0 record was almost assuredly going to be handed a blemish. In stepped Guiton, who did little to help the Buckeyes’ cause until the game was just about over. With 2:40 left and the score 22-14, the then-redshirt junior threw an interception. Meyer grabbed Guiton, who was noticeably distraught. “I said, ‘You’re going to win us a game,’” Meyer said. “He looked right at me. I think he was down but I think that moment kind of picked him up.” OSU got the ball back, and Guiton led a 61-yard drive with 47 seconds left that ended with a touchdown pass to then-redshirt junior wide receiver Chris Fields. The Buckeyes tied the game with a two-point conversion on a lobbed throw to then-freshman tight end Jeff Heuerman and won the contest in overtime. Best underdog story: Zach Boren’s move to linebacker OSU’s defense had shredded in back-to-back games against Nebraska and Indiana in mid-October. The Buckeyes allowed a combined 87 points in those two contests, and at the heart of Meyer’s concerns about his defense was the linebacker position. Boren, then-senior and 30-game starter at fullback, had played linebacker in high school and was recruited to OSU to play that position. Sensing that his team needed someone to step up and fill a void, Boren asked Meyer if he could play linebacker during an October practice. Meyer obliged to the request, and Boren responded by helping revamp a defense that allowed just 57 points in November. The Pickerington native recorded 50 tackles on the season and averaged 8.2 tackles per game in his six games at linebacker, including a career-high 12 in the overtime win at Wisconsin. “Talk about Zach Boren. You want someone to write a book on, wow, that would be good if you go write a book on Zach Boren,” Meyer said. Best team: Football The basketball team can make its arguments: Big Ten Tournament champions, an Elite Eight Appearance and an 11-game winning streak. The football team only needs to make one, though. Undefeated. Meyer and his squad literally accomplished everything they could in 2012, winning all 12 of their games and recording the school’s first perfect season since 2002. read more

Suspect wanted for armed robbery at La Mesa Baskin Robbins

first_img KUSI Newsroom, April 4, 2018 Posted: April 4, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Updated: 4:11 PMcenter_img LA MESA (KUSI) — The La Mesa Police Department Wednesday asked the public to help locate and identify a suspect wanted for armed robbery at a local Baskin Robbins.On Monday at approximately 9:53 p.m., a male armed with a handgun robbed the Baskin Robbins located at 8807 ½ La Mesa Boulevard, in La Mesa.The suspect entered the store and walked behind the counter, where he brandished a semi-automatic handgun and demanded the money from the register. After one employee complied, the suspect ordered the two employees to lay face down on the floor.The suspect then fled out the front door of the business in an unknown direction.La Mesa Police Officers searched the surrounding areas with assistance from the San Diego Sheriff’s Department helicopter ASTREA, but were unable to locate the suspect.The suspect is described as a light-skinned black male adult, approximately 6’00 tall and weighing approximately 200 pounds. The suspect was wearing a black ski mask, black sweatshirt, light colored pants, and dark shoes.Anyone with information is encouraged to call the La Mesa Police Department. You may also call Crime Stoppers’ anonymous toll-free tip line (888) 580-TIPS or www.sdcrimestoppers.com.  You can remain anonymous, and be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000 for information in this case. KUSI Newsroom Suspect wanted for armed robbery at La Mesa Baskin Robbinslast_img read more

Game of Thrones star Kit Harrington reveals Jon Snows future at end

first_imgKit Harington as Jon Snow with Liam Cunningham as Davos SeaworthHBOFans have been trying hard to put the disappointing final season of Game of Thrones behind them. But the cast keeps bringing it back up to the forefront of their minds.Reportedly, Game of Thrones star Kit Harington was asked about his character’s last moment on the show during a pre-Emmys chat with The Hollywood Reporter. Fans have apparently wondered about the finale of Game of Thrones, in which Snow — having been relegated back to the Night’s Watch — left Castle Black and was seen heading beyond the Wall. Was he was going on a ranging mission? Was he merely escorting the Free Folk? Or was he leaving the Night’s Watch behind and rejoining the Wildlings to live with them?Turns out, that final assumption (which, admittedly, was the most popular consensus online) is correct.  Jon Snow and Daenerys TargaryenGame of Thrones Official Facebook”[S]eeing him go beyond the Wall back to something true, something honest, something pure with these people he was always told he belongs with — the Free Folk — it felt to me like he was finally free,” said the actor, who is currently nominated for the Emmys’ Best Actor in a Drama Series award. “Instead of being chained and sent to the Wall, it felt like he was set free. It was a really sweet ending. As much as he had done a horrible thing [in killing Daenerys], as much as he had felt that pain, the actual ending for him was finally being released.”We have to say that no matter how much the cast still tries to defend the final season, there was no excuse for the final episodes of season eight.last_img read more

How Facebook Was Able To Siphon Off Phone Call And Text Logs

first_img Share REUTERS/Dado RuvicA smartphone user shows the Facebook application on his phone in the central Bosnian town of Zenica, in this photo illustration, May 2, 2013.The news that Facebook’s Android app has been collecting call and text histories is yet another black eye for the social media giant. But just why was Facebook able to siphon off records of who its users were contacting — and when — in the first place?The short answer: Because Google let it. The longer answer: Well, it’s complicated.The social network acknowledged on Sunday that it began uploading call and text logs from phones running Google’s Android system in 2015 — first via its Messenger app and later through an option in Facebook Lite, a stripped-down version of its main app. Facebook added that only users who gave appropriate permission were affected, that it didn’t collect the contents of messages or calls, and that users can opt out of the data collection and have the stored logs deleted by changing their app settings.Facebook did not respond to multiple requests for more specifics. The kerfuffle over this data collection, first reported by the website Ars Technica , follows a week of turmoil for the social network involving charges that it allowed political consultants to steal the data of 50 million users in order to influence elections.There’s a reason Facebook’s actions were restricted to Android phones. Apple locks down app permissions tightly, which offers more privacy protection to iPhone users. “Apple’s fundamental approach is to collect the minimum amount of information to keep the service running, and keep customers in control of the information,” said Rich Mogull, CEO of the security firm Securosis.But Android has long been more indulgent.Until recently, in fact, Google let app developers gain access to a phone’s call and text logs. All they needed was an app that required access to user contacts. Once users agreed, Android would then also grant access to those communication histories.Starting in 2012 with its “Jelly Bean” release, Android would notify people installing such apps that they were also giving apps access to their call and text logs, but still required them to agree to all those permissions at once. Rejecting the request meant the apps wouldn’t work.It wasn’t until 2015 when Google released Android 6.0, dubbed “Marshmallow,” that Android phones finally split up those permissions. That meant users could agree to share contacts, but reject access to their messaging and phone histories.That’s the same year Facebook says its apps started collecting this information. But many Android users aren’t using the latest version of the software. In fact, they often can’t get it even if they want it.Apple owns both the software and hardware for iPhones, which allows it to push out new versions of its iOS operating software at will. Google, by contrast, is largely at the mercy of both mobile carriers and hardware makers when it comes to distributing new Android versions.There are nearly 20,000 Android phone models now in service, and carriers like to tweak the software for each to ensure that it will work as smoothly as possible on their networks. As a result, new Android versions reach users very slowly.As of January, about 65 percent of iPhone users were using the latest iOS software, introduced in 2017. Less than 1 percent of Android devices currently use the latest version of Android, known as “Oreo.” (Many of them are owners of Google’s new Pixel phones, which get software updates directly from Google.)Just over half of all Android users are using the two previous versions, which allow them to specifically reject the sharing of communication logs. Last October, Google began forcing all apps to follow the new rules when they issue updates, even on phones running older versions of Android.All that leaves two big questions unanswered. Why did Google set up Android permissions this way? And how many other apps have taken advantages of the same setup?Experts and privacy advocates say the answer to the first question is probably related to Google’s advertising-based business model, which — like Facebook — depends on collecting detailed information about users in order to target them with tailored ads. Apple, meanwhile, derives its profits from the sale of devices and services like Apple Music.Another possible factor: Android was playing catch-up with Apple for many years, and was eager to attract app developers in order to attain parity with Apple’s App Store. Some app developers may have found greater access to user data on Android attractive — as Facebook did.Experts say it’s not clear if other apps are going as far as Facebook in terms of tracking call history and texts, but it’s very possible.“In a lot of ways, Facebook is the tip of the iceberg,” said Bob O’Donnell, chief analyst at Technalysis Research. “There are plenty of other people doing this kind of data collection.”It is unclear how many apps gained access to call logs so far or how many users’ call logs had been sent to app developers. A Google spokesperson declined to comment.One major Android phone maker expressed uncertainty over its role in protecting user privacy. “At this time the nature of the data breach is unclear so it is difficult to comment on the cause or the solution,” LG Electronics Inc. said Tuesday in a statement.last_img read more

Obama Calls Trumps Decision To Leave Iran Deal A Serious Mistake

first_imgPhoto by Benoit Tessier/Reuters/PBS NewsHourFormer U.S. president Barack Obama speaks at a conference during his first visit to France since he left the White House, Paris, France December 2, 2017. The session, organized by an association called “Les Napoleons” is hosted by Orange CEO Stephane Richard. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier – RC1299EF4EF0Former President Barack Obama is calling President Donald Trump’s decision to pull out of the Iran deal a “serious mistake” that will erode America’s global credibility.Obama’s administration brokered the deal. He says Tuesday that Trump’s decision to withdraw is “misguided,” especially because Iran has been complying.Obama also warned: “The consistent flouting of agreements that our country is a party to risks eroding America’s credibility, and puts us at odds with the world’s major powers.”Obama says that without the deal, the U.S. “could eventually be left with a losing choice between a nuclear-armed Iran or another war in the Middle East.”He says the deal remains a model for what diplomacy can accomplish, including when it comes to North Korea.There are few issues more important to the security of the US than the potential spread of nuclear weapons or the potential for even more destructive war in the Middle East. Today’s decision to put the JCPOA at risk is a serious mistake. My full statement: https://t.co/4oTdXESbxe— Barack Obama (@BarackObama) May 8, 2018 Sharelast_img read more

Reinventing a Legend Interview With Cory Barlog and the Cast of God

first_img If you’re a gamer, then you know the title everyone’s currently talking about is God of War. Like I said in my review, this is easily one of the best releases of 2018. It comes as no surprise God of War would get spotlighted during this year’s Tribeca Games Festival, where the game’s director and cast spoke about its development and shared behind-the-scenes stories in front of a live audience.After the panel, I interviewed director Cory Barlog, and actors Christopher Judge (Kratos), Danielle Bisutti (Freya), and Jeremy Davies (Balder). Given the spirit of the event (a celebration of story-driven media), I focused on how the actors brought their respective characters to life and how wearing motion-capture equipment impacted their performances. I also asked the director about how this entry honors the legacy of the series and if he believes they were successful on that end.What was it about Christopher Judge that made him an ideal actor to play Kratos? Was it due to his natural speaking voice?Cory Barlog: The power he had as a performer was the thing that really drew it. I mean, I also was a gigantic Stargate fan, so I entertained the idea early on but because of a lack of confidence, didn’t know if we should approach him. It took a little while but then it came back around and everything kind of fused together.First and foremost we were looking for the physicality in the voice, but that was such a small part of it. There was so much of the performance that had to come through on the set with all the actors because I needed to do it all in one take. Everybody had to hit their sort of emotional range all the time. He was, without a doubt, just so incredibly powerful, even in the first audition. It’s wonderful.Jeremy Davies: I want to credit Chris as well. I have met a number of individuals who were just born with this gift. They can roll out of bed and sound like god. I’ve seen folks rely on that. But what you get when you’re this close to him is that you really sense this powerful presence. He isn’t relying on his god-given voice. He’s got a lot to back it up. He is a dangerously gifted guy.What was the motion capture process like? Was it difficult to act while having all of that motion-capture equipment on you? Without a traditional set, how much of your imagination did you need to use?Judge: Stargate kind of came out right at the beginning of CGI. So, very often, our reactions to stuff didn’t match what was there. I learned that when someone says “it’s immense, it’s the world” it’s believable. Every time Cory would say “so, this is going to [be huge],” I took him at his word. Thank god that I did because all of the set pieces were just mind-blowing. I was watching my son play, and I remember thinking to myself: “My reaction, it almost wasn’t big enough.”Davies: I found it interesting. The whole apparatus, the camera, these massive hard drives right over your heart. But the phenomenon with having a camera right in your face, I found really surprisingly helpful. When you’re shooting film, the cameras use these long lenses; you kind of feel this tendency, if it’s wide especially, to push it. With the camera so close, it can be reassuring to know that when they see it, they’re not going to miss anything. You don’t have to redo it. I found that really, really helpful. It helped me get over the fact you got these suits on.Judge: You really articulated something that I felt but I never thought about. When you do film or television, you generally do a lot of takes. You always get a break, you’re off camera. But sometimes when you do something that is surprising and it’s in the wide, then you have to re-create it.Judge: Every time we did discover something [during this shoot], it was documented.Davies: That’s right. From every conceivable angle.Bisutti: A lot of times in the theater, you’re in a black box. It’s black box theater. There’s no set. You create these imaginary sets and circumstances and you can see it. So, as we were there, we had the privilege of sometimes watching the rehearsals or sometimes seeing the scenes and the animation that was happening so we can kind of get a sense of the world. Of course, then actually watching it when it all came together was like, oh my god, that is a big scope, the world we’re living in.Davies: Because you’re surrounded by all these computers, computer power from every single angle, you could imagine a director just having an attitude of a robot like we talked about [during the panel]. An attitude of “we will fix your performance.” But it was like, as I said, equal to the best experience I’ve had. It’s a human being working with human beings.Chris, was it intimidating to know you were portraying such a beloved character that people have high expectations for?Judge: I… sometimes got a little performance anxiety [laughs]. Especially in the beginning, when we were discussing what he should sound like. I worked with a voice coach but we quickly moved away from that from the first day.Barlog: That was the fantastic sort of miscommunication on that one. We had talked to the voice coach but somehow there was a misinterpretation. I said we need to look at the previous Kratos’ performance since there is a sense of the speech pattern that can act as the foundation. The interpretation was more “this is the time period” so you [Chris] had more of an English accent at some point. That was was totally my fault. So we went through the whole thing. You trained with all that stuff. You came on the set with a little bit of this English accent and we’re like “what the fuck?”Judge: Cory walked up to me and he was like: “Was that a British accent?” I thought you wanted just a hint of that [laughs].Thank you for getting rid of that. That’s just weird. Kratos with an English accent? No way.Bisutti: Especially in Norse mythology. You see those films in Roman times and they speak with a British accent. That’s not quite right [laughs].Danielle and Jeremy, did you discuss your characters off-set? Your relationship with one another was very natural. How were you able to make that authentic?Bisutti: Well, I just fell in love with him the second I met him. I was already a fan of his work. I mean, Lost was for me one of the best shows ever created. But of course, I’d known him prior. I just have this approach of just opening my heart as an actor, opening my heart to these imaginary circumstances and believing them as real. We actually didn’t discuss very much, did we? A little bit. But we kind of just brought it in the moment and riffed off each other.Davies: It was instantaneous. The first day you got on set, everybody kind of warmly welcomed each other. It felt like the momentum, this sort of kinetic energy, was instant. We were going from zero to one hundred right away. I just felt like we were all family from a long time ago. It never felt like we had to work on it or force any of it. That was just incredibly lucky. I was thankful every single day that it just came naturally.Judge: You said something very interesting. Acting is supposed to be the recreation of the natural. But what you’re asked to do is something very unnatural. To walk into spaces where you don’t know people with an open heart and an open mind, which is very unnatural and can be very, very painful. We keep saying over and over again about the safe space that it was. That’s why it always happened. The ground was watered and fertilized and lovingly cultivated so that it was a space for these relationships to grow at a very unnatural speed.Cory, in a lot of ways, this is a soft reboot of the franchise. You’re introducing a lot of new mechanics, storylines, locales and so on. At the same time, you still have this giant legacy behind it. Was it a challenge to balance everything people know about God of War with all of the new elements you wanted to incorporate?Yeah, it was something that I was conscious of at all times. To not just respect the work that we had done, but to honor it. To know that we made every choice that we made to create this world very specifically. The continuation of this growth, the evolution needed to be built on that foundation. While you can blur your eyes and see something differently, the clarity shows you very clearly, that the DNA, that the molecular level of what we were doing, was so incredibly inspired by what we started with. It’s easy, very easy, to lose sight of that.We’re blessed to have such good, smart people like Richard Gaubert and Matt Sophos, our writers, being on set every day. They were the honesty that I needed. That gut-check, that mirror that I needed to look at. To say “Alright where are we going with this?” Because, I would just throw things in on the day of like “Hey, something came to me last night. Let’s try this.” And they were the sounding-board to go “I don’t know about that,” and I had to defend it. If I couldn’t defend it, it was something I realized, okay that’s not what we need to do.It was constant discussion, constant evaluation of “is this Kratos?” He can evolve and change, but does he go in a direction that is antithetical to where he began? There were a lot of times where we had to course-correct to ensure the evolution felt correct. I think the response that people are having says that we did hit a few of those notes right to resonate, to connect in the right way. Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey. Stay on targetcenter_img ‘God of War’ Documentary ‘Raising Kratos’ Explores 2018’s Top Video GamePS4 Hits Turn Tabletop With ‘God of War,’ ‘Bloodborne&… last_img read more

Made in India and for a cause

first_imgEmpowerment in association with Uttarakhand Artist Welfare Association are running Handloom clusters for tribal women artisans and weavers affected from Uttarakhand disaster. It motivated them to pick up the threads of their life using their craft to move on. This effort has resulted in many tribal women coming together and creating beautiful handmade and hand woven products.These products will be showcased in an exhibition Colours of Himalayas being organised on  December 12 at Artizen Art Gallery in the Capital. On display will be shawls, stoles, carpets, bamboo products, copper ware products, paintings and photographs depicting Uttarakhand and its crafts. All proceeds from the resulting sales of the products will directly go to these women artisans and weavers, motivating and inspiring them to come back to normal stream and move towards sustainable development. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Santosh Kumar Gangwar  Minister of State for Ministry of Textiles (IC) will be inaugurating the exhibition as the chief guest of the event. The exhibition will remain open till December 14.The exhibition is being curated by Sonika Agrawal and Kumar Vikas Saxena, who have closely watched these women going from being totally helpless and dejected to the spirit of wanting to move ahead and create a better living for themselves and their families. They say, “The immersion of the tribal women in crafts have given them a purpose of life and renewed their strength and courage, providing them with hope for the future.” Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixEmpowerment, a sociocultural not for profit NGO, aims to preserve art and cultural heritage of India through promotion and revival of arts and crafts. A socially responsible organisation, Empowerment spreads its message and works through capacity building of women and youth. In June 2013, a cloudburst on the North Indian state of Uttarakhand caused devastating floods and landslides becoming the country’s worst natural disaster. The aftermath of this tragic turn of events left many homeless and wanting. Though relief poured in from various sectors, a sustained effort is required so that people are rehabilitated and empowered through capacity building and work towards sustenance. Towards this objective of filling in the gap for a sustained efforts and rural development, Empowerment and Uttarakhand Artist Welfare Association are actively working with flood affected tribal women belonging to remote areas of Pithoragarh, Uttarakhand. This initiative has motivated the women to pick up the threads of their life using their craft to move on. It has also resulted in many tribal women coming together and creating beautiful handmade and hand woven products.Empowerment and Uttarakhand Artist Welfare Association are non-profit organizations, registered under the Societies Registration Act XXI, 1860 that actively advocates using art, culture and traditions as a tool for social change and emancipation, for creation of a sensitive, sustainable and peaceful world, for bringing nations closer and for forming a nexus between the citizens and governments.When: December 12-14Where: Artizen Art Gallery, Bahadur Shah Zafar marglast_img read more