Tag: 上海晚上10点后好玩的

Two receive minor injuries after Buncrana crash

first_imgTwo people have sustained minor injuries following a crash near Lisfannon, Buncrana earlier this evening.The accident between two cars happened just before 7pm.The emergency services were at the scene and the road was closed for a short time. Two receive minor injuries after Buncrana crash was last modified: November 29th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img

Unreliability in Science Reaches Epic Proportions

first_imgDr Jerry Bergman is a contributing author and scientist for Creation-Evolution Headlines. Read his Author Profile for his previous articles. (Visited 531 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 by Dr Jerry BergmanAudio Playerhttps://crev.info/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Bergman-20170603-ReproducibilityCrisis.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Concerns about unreliable findings in biomedical research, such as cancer research, have been well documented. The problem is known as the ‘reproducibility crisis.’ If this is a problem in a field open to observation and visible in the here and now—biomedical research—what about evolution, which is based on events and extinct life forms that are claimed to have existed eons ago?University of Bristol Professor Marcus Munafò writes in Nature in a book review about the crisis,As scientists, we are supposed to be objective and disinterested, careful sifters of evidence. The reality is messier. Our training can give us only so much protection from natural tendencies to see patterns in randomness, respond unconsciously to incentives, and argue forcefully in defence of our own positions, even in the face of mounting contrary evidence. In the competitive crucible of modern science, various perverse incentives conspire to undermine the scientific method, leading to a literature littered with unreliable findings. [1]It’s an alarming statement. The problem is even more serious, though, with evolutionary studies. These are usually based on fragmentary pieces of evidence, like fossils or genes, that evolutionists sometimes manipulate to defend their particular ideas, or at least to try to provide some semblance of plausibility for their pet theories. As Mark Twain aptly stated a century ago, reconstruction of past life is often based on “nine bones and six hundred barrels of plaster.”A wide-ranging critique of modern biomedical research by science journalist Richard Harris documents the fact that, over the past decade the replication of many published research findings has shown their results to be false, or at least questionable. [2]  And since most findings in biomedical science have not been replicated, the actual failures may be far worse than Harris documents. In his book, Rigor Mortis: How Sloppy Science Creates Worthless Cures, Crushes Hope, and Wastes Billions, Harris calls for a new discipline to address the problem: he calls it ‘meta-science,’ the scientific study of science itself (4/04/17).Among the shocking examples Harris cites, there was a 2012 study by Glenn Begley that found only 11% (6 out of 53) of ‘landmark’ cancer research studies could be confirmed by the biotechnology firm Amgen. [3] Since then, “numerous studies (most recently in psychology and cancer biology) have confirmed that failure to replicate published findings is the norm.” Munafò  continues, saying that “Harris identifies potential culprits, from the complexity of modern biomedical science to the limitations of tools and training, and perverse incentives in modern academia.” [4] The worst failure rate came from a study that “replicated 100 psychology studies, and fewer than half got the same results” as the original published papers. [5]The reasons for irreproducibility are many, but whatever the causes, these alarming statistics show that many original or even replicated studies are unreliable. This study was originally published in one of the most prestigious science magazines, Science. [6] And much research on evolution theories cannot even be replicated in the same way that biomedical research can. At best, the evidence used to arrive at evolutionary conclusions can be reexamined – that is, if permission is granted by the person or organization that owns the artifacts, often bones.Replication is an important scientific tool for exposing fraudulent research. Many consider it a hallmark of science. In actual practice, though, replication often is not carried out for many reasons. Most researchers lack the time, money, and motivation to replicate the work of others because replication is not original science. It is mostly arduous work with few potential rewards. The scientific establishment and the media reward originality. Being second usually wins few accolades. For these and other reasons, replications of most studies are infrequently attempted unless they are particularly controversial.Another reason replication is not often attempted is because it requires the original experimenters to delineate the exact protocol they used for their experiments. But in evolutionary studies, analysis of fossils or other data cited in papers, often are not, or cannot, be perfectly described in detail. The descriptions published by researchers may be detailed, but are often incomplete.Munafò lists a few of the many problems with both biomedical and evolutionary studies:Failure is a normal part of science, but dressing it up as success (for example, by presenting a secondary outcome as the primary outcome) is misleading. So is packaging exploratory, hypothesis-generating work as confirmatory, hypothesis-testing work. Unfortunately, with few ways to publish negative results, such practices are encouraged by incentives to present clean results with a compelling narrative, and be the first to do so.The lesson is clear. We must read all science studies with a skeptical eye – especially studies purported to show evidence for Darwinism.[1] Marcus Munafò, “Reproducibility blues.” Nature, 543:619. March 30, 2017.[2] Richard Harris, Rigor Mortis: How Sloppy Science Creates Worthless Cures, Crushes Hope, and Wastes Billions. New York: Basic Books, 2017.[3] C. Glen Begley and Lee M. Ellis, “Drug development: Raise standards for preclinical cancer research.” Nature. 483:531–533, 2012.[4] Munafò, Ibid.[5]  Brian Handwerk, “Scientists Replicated 100 Psychology Studies, and Fewer Than Half Got the Same Results.” Smithsonian.com, August 27, 2015.[6] “Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science.” Science, 349(6251):943. August 28, 2015.[7] Munafò, Ibid.last_img read more

Tax relief for individuals, companies

first_img11 February 2009The proposed adjustments to personal income tax schedules will provide middle and lower income earners with R13.6-billion in tax relief, Finance Minister Trevor Manuel announced on Wednesday.Delivering his 2009/10 Budget speech to Parliament in Cape Town, Manuel said the adjustments to personal income tax would fully compensate South Africans for wage inflation.“The tax-free income threshold next year will be R54 200 for taxpayers below the age of 65 and R84  200 for those over 65,” he said.The tax-free threshold for the 2009/10 tax year will effectively increase from R46 000 for those below the age of 65, to R54 200.The revised estimate for tax collection for 2008/09 is R14.2-billion, which is less than the National Treasury planned in its 2008 Budget, he said.“For the year ahead, the main budget revenue estimate is R50-billion lower than we projected in February last year, against the background of slower growth, depressed trade and declining company profits.”Tax relief is also proposed for companies that invest in energy-efficient technology, with an additional allowance of 15 percent, on condition that there is proof of the resulting energy efficiencies as certified by the Energy Efficiency Agency.The minister, on the basis of a letter sent as part of the “Tips for Trevor” initiative, said he had also proposed a tax on companies using incandescent light bulbs, in an effort to get people to make use of energy saving compact fluorescent light bulbs.Taxes on petrol and diesel will increase by 40.5 and 41.5 cents per litre respectively, the minister announced, adding that road users would have to fork out an additional 23 cents and 24 cents per litre as well for fuel levies.“As road-users know, there is a substantial increase in spending on maintenance and construction under way, and we still face a heavy burden of road accidents and associated compensation claims.“These are costs that have to be covered, and so there will be increases of 17.5 cents in the road accident fund levy.”As per the 2009/10 Budget proposals, a packet of cigarettes will now cost 88 cents more, a 750ml bottle of natural wine will cost 10.5 cents more, a 340ml can of beer will cost 7 cents more, and a 750ml bottle of liquor such as whiskey will cost consumers R3.21 more, he announced.Manuel said that after discussions with both organised labour and the mining industry, and taking into account the impact of the economic slowdown on the mining industry, he proposed that the new mining royalties regime be deferred to 2010.“This provides a boost to the industry of about R1.8-billion [which would have been paid to government], which will assist in minimising job losses,” he said.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

SA to launch Aids plan for sex workers

first_img17 December 2013 South Africa’s plan to help protect sex workers against HIV and help them access treatment is a “flagship model” that should be followed by the rest of the world, Mark Dybul of the Global Fund to Fight Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria told Africa’s biggest Aids conference held in Cape Town last week. Dybul lauded South Africa’s National Strategic Plan for HIV Prevention, Care and Treatment for Sex Workers as a comprehensive plan that “showed remarkable leadership and (was) a flagship of how we must respond not only on this continent but around the world”, Business Day reported. Dybul was speaking at the International Conference on AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases in Africa on 10 December.Scaling up The plan was developed by South African National Aids Council (Sanac), the Sex Workers’ Education and Advocacy Taskforce (Sweat), Sisonke Sex Workers Movement and the departments of Social Development and Health, among others. It will form a part of the country’s National Strategic Plan for HIV and AIDS, TB and STIs 2012 – 2016. The plan involves a significant scaling up of a comprehensive HIV prevention package, improving services, reducing the discrimination against sex workers and mobilising resources, Business Day says. It aims to increase access to HIV treatment for the estimated 153 000 sex workers in South Africa, reduce the violence and human rights abuses perpetrated against them and to promote their well being. Fareed Abdullah, Sanca’s chief executive, writes in the foreword to the plan that addressing the health of sex workers is “crucial to our plans to combat the spread of HIV” in South Africa as they are most at risk of acquiring HIV and other sexually transmitted infections”. Dybul reportedly said it was “appalling” that sex workers were 12 times less likely to receive antiretroviral treatment than other people. He said their rights had to be respected and they had to be brought into the human family and given choices regarding what to do with their lives. The launch of the plan, which was due to take place at the conference on Tuesday last week, has been postponed until 2014 out of respect for the passing of Nelson Mandela, South Africa’s former president, who died on 5 December. The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria donated R3-billion in October to South Africa for its HIV/Aids programmes, an amount which will supplement prevention and referral services for two-and-a-half years. Further funding from the organisation will assist specific HIV health services for sex workers in the future, Sanca’s Rentia Agenbag told SAinfo. Business Day and SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Rumble Strips and Feedback

first_img Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Now You know how you are sometimes driving down the road and you run a little bit off course? Rumble strips are those lines carved into the side of the road that create a loud noise and vibration. They are they to provide you with the feedback that you’re slightly off the road. Without rumble strips you might run off the road–or far enough onto the shoulder–that something bad happens. Rumble strips also tell you to slow down on freeway off-ramps, that you are going too fast to safely exit.Rumble strips are annoying. They’re designed to get your attention and provide feedback when feedback is necessary.Your Rumble Strips Are QuietAll of the results that you’re generating in sales and business also come with feedback. But most of the feedback doesn’t easily command your attention.When things are working the feedback is positive. You’re winning opportunities. You’re improving. Things are moving forward for you fast. No alarm bells are sounding. But you’re also provided feedback when things aren’t working quite so well. Even this feedback may not garner your attention.When your dream clients aren’t responding to your attempts to capture their time and attention it’s feedback that what you’re doing isn’t creating value for them. Their silence is feedback. That silence should jar you to action just like rumble strips.When your pipeline is shallow, when you don’t have enough opportunities, it’s feedback that your prospecting efforts aren’t working. Maybe it’s feedback that what you’re doing isn’t working, but maybe it’s feedback that you just aren’t doing enough. Either way, it’s feedback that you need to make some adjustment to what you’re doing, that you’re off course.When your inside team struggles to execute on what you sold it might be feedback that you’re giving them a poor handoff. Or it might also mean that you’re selling something that your team can’t easily deliver. Maybe your team just needs your help selling inside to acquire the resources they need to execute. More feedback, if you are keen enough to observe the noise your team makes.The results that you’re producing, good or bad, come with feedback. That uncomfortable feeling you get when things aren’t working is like driving over rumble strips. It’s supposed to warn you, to jar you loose from your comfortable state and make you aware that you need to change. It means you’re slightly (or seriously) off course and need to make corrections.Pay attention to the rumble strips. Pay attention to the feedback (and remember sometimes the feedback is silence).QuestionsWhat kind of feedback are you receiving?How do you know when you’re slightly off course?What kind of warnings do yo get that you are going to fast for your client, that your speed is jeopardizing an opportunity?Like driving, are you normally way off course, or does a slight correction make an enormous difference?last_img read more

TMC, BJP leave Left, Cong. behind

first_imgThe growth of the Trinamool Congress (TMC) and the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) at the cost of the Left Front and the Congress continues unabated in West Bengal. While TMC’s seat share went up to 66% in the 2018 Bengal panchayat elections from 52% in 2013, the BJP’s share grew by 17% at the Gram Panchayat (GP) level in the three-tier rural polls. The seat share at the GP level provides a very clear picture of the political scene in rural Bengal where 74% of the State’s electorate reside. A similar trend was noticed in nearly all the recent elections and by-polls.The saffron party got a little over 1% seats in 2013 at the GP level. In this week’s panchayat elections, the BJP bagged more than 18% seats in an election process marred by violence. Even after the Opposition could not field a candidate in about one-third of the seats, the BJP’s vote share increased significantly. On the other hand, the Left Front’s seat share dropped noticeably.The Left Front got marginally over 32% seats in the panchayat polls of 2013 at the GP level, which was nearly a 20% drop from that in 2008. In 2018, the seat share has reached its nadir. The Left Front got 5% seats, according to the data released by the State Election Commission [SEC] on Friday night. The Congress’s seat share has come down to 3% from 11%.Infact, the seat share of the Independent candidates was more than the Left Front or the Congress at the GP level. The reason, as it appeared on Friday, is that the Independent candidates, who belong to the one or the other factions of the ruling party in most of the cases, have won in many seats defeating the “official” TMC candidate. Realising that many of the Independent candidates are affiliated to the TMC, party chief Mamata Banerjee indicated on Thursday that they will eventually be brought back to the party fold. However, Independent candidates defeating the Left and the Congress has been described as “a unique development” in Bengal politics.While BJP got 12% and 3.5% seats at the Panchayat Samity (PS) and Zilla Parishad (ZP) level respectively, the Left Front got 2% and less than 1% at the PS and ZP levels. The Congress, too, has nearly been decimated at PS and ZP level.last_img read more

MP Says SLB Funds Should Be Directed To Critical Areas of Study

first_imgBy Latonya Linton, JIS Reporter Member of Parliament for North West St. Ann, Dr. Dayton Campbell, is recommending that adjustments be made to the Student Loan Bureau (SLB) to focus on areas of study that are critical to nation development.“I believe the SLB should first concern itself with making loans available to persons pursuing tertiary studies in areas…such as Mathematics, Pharmacy, Engineering, the Sciences,” he stated.Dr. Campbell was opening the debate on a private members motion on funding for tertiary education, on June 11 in the House of Representatives.He stated that new programmes should be assessed for relevance, in terms of whether they “respond to labour market needs, foster innovation or serve community aspirations, before approval”.Dr. Campbell said that while he is not suggesting that persons pursuing degrees that are “oversubscribed” or those with “a low employment potential” should be denied tertiary education, the SLB’s limited resources should be directed to those areas which are of strategic importance to the country, and at lower interest rates.These rates, he noted further, “should be inversely proportionate to the need of the area for national development thus the higher the need the lower the interest rate”.According to Dr. Campbell, the country is in need of Mathematics and Science teachers and in order to increase enrolment in these areas, students should get incentives to pursue these subjects at the tertiary level.“I want to take it a step further and propose that no income tax be collected for the first three years of employment for Mathematics and Science teachers, who needed state financing to complete their studies. This portion would instead go straight to the Bureau as a part of their repayment,” Dr. Campbell said.He also proposed the establishment of an income-contingency repayment plan, which would base the monthly loan repayments on the salaries of borrowers. He noted that such a loansystem addresses risk and uncertainty faced by individuals by providing insurance against inability to repay and improves progressiveness by providing a lower public subsidy for graduates that obtain higher private returns.Demand for student loans has increased over the last six years, moving from 6,600 persons in 2007 to 16,600 in 2012, and is projected to swell to over 20,000 persons for the upcoming academic year.The growth in demand, coupled with the annual increase in tuition costs, has significantly increased the pressure on the limited resources of the SLB to provide loans, which is estimated to reach $20 billion in the 2015/16 financial year.For the 2013/14 academic year, approximately $4.9 billion is required to fully cover the projected demand, which will be financed by the Education Tax and loan inflows from the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB).On March 19, the House of Representatives approved a Government guarantee of a US$20 million loan from the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) to the SLB.last_img read more