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Farmers’ income grew seven times in 13 years in Odisha

first_imgOdisha farmers’ incomes grew more than seven times over a span of 13 years, the Naveen Patnaik government has claimed.The government, in its recently released draft Agriculture Policy 2019, says an average Odisha farmer earned around ₹7,731 per month, or around ₹92,772 per year.Draft policy“In 2002-03, his average monthly income was ₹1,062, which means that in the 13 years between 2002-03 and 2015-16, Odisha farmers’ incomes grew more than seven times or at a CAGR (compound annual growth rate) of 16.5% in nominal terms and 8.4% in real terms,” it states.The draft policy states that comparing the CAGR with other Indian States, Odisha’s growth rate emerges as the highest in the country during that period.“During the same period, average Indian farmer’s income grew from ₹2,115 to ₹8,931 which is at a CAGR of 11.7% in nominal and 3.7% in real terms. Odisha is fast catching up with other Indian States. Odisha’s farmer incomes grew much faster than even the rate at which its own agricultural GDP grew,” it says.According to the draft policy, between 2002-03 and 2015-16, Odisha’s agricultural GDP grew at a CAGR of 3.7% and its farmer incomes grew at more than double that rate at 8.4%.Odisha is largely a rural-agrarian economy. Close to 83% of its people live in rural areas and about 61.8% of its 17.5 million work-force is employed in agriculture. In the 16 years since the beginning of this century (2000-01 to 2016-17), Odisha’s agricultural GDP nearly doubled in real terms, clocking an average annual growth rate of about 4.5%, higher than the India average of 3.1%. The State accounts for 3% of India’s agricultural GDP.last_img read more

Radiotherapy combined with androgendeprivation therapy improves overall survival up to 10 years

first_img Source:https://www.nrgoncology.org/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 23 2018The long-term follow up of the NRG Oncology trial RTOG 9408, studying the addition of short-term androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) to radiotherapy (RT) for men with early, localized prostate adenocarcinoma, indicated that RT combined with ADT is superior to RT alone for overall survival (OS) up to 10.4 years following treatment. However, when researchers assessed these results up to 18 years, the benefits of adding ADT to RT dissipated. The results were presented at the American Society for Radiation Oncology’s Annual Meeting in San Antonio, TX on October 22, 2018 during the Genitourinary 2: Long-Term Updates of Prospective Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials session. The study was also awarded a “Best of ASTRO” designation.Related StoriesBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerResearchers use AI to develop early gastric cancer endoscopic diagnosis systemStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskThe primary aim of NRG-RTOG 9408 was to determine if the addition of four months of ADT before and during RT would improve the overall survival of men with prostate adenocarcinoma. Secondary objectives included determining the difference in disease-specific mortality (DSM), biochemical failure (BF), incidence of distant metastases (DM) and local progression (LP). 1974 men were randomly assigned to either receive RT alone (990 patients) or RT plus four months of ADT (984 patients).”After concluding that the addition of ADT did provide benefit for both primary and secondary aims, we continued to survey results up to 18 years from treatment. The median follow up for surviving patients was 14.8 years. Our study team noticed that overall survival data began to favor the radiotherapy alone arm over the experimental, androgen-deprivation therapy arm following the first ten years after treatment. However, disease-specific mortality, biochemical failure, incidence of distant metastases and local progression continued to show long-term benefit,” stated Dr. Christopher U. Jones of Sutter Cancer Centers and Lead Author of NRG-RTOG 9408.The incidence of late grade 3, 4, and 5 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities was low and similar between the ADT and RT arms.last_img read more

Mechanisms that govern HIV latency differ in the gut and blood finds

first_imgRelated StoriesHIV persists in spinal fluid even after long-term treatment and is linked to cognitive deficitsHIV DNA persists in spinal fluid despite treatment, linked to cognitive impairmentScripps CHAVD wins $129 million NIH grant to advance new HIV vaccine approachAvailable antiretroviral drugs significantly prolong life expectancy in people living with HIV. However, the virus can escape host defenses and drug treatment by establishing a reversibly silent infection in immune cells that produce a protein called CD4 (i.e., CD4+ T cells). This latent infection, which is characterized by inactivated HIV transcription, represents the major barrier to a cure. While much of the research to date has highlighted the importance of CD4+ T cells in the blood as reservoirs for latent HIV, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the gut may play an integral role as a major tissue reservoir for the virus. To compare the mechanisms that inhibit HIV transcription in the gut and blood, Yukl and his colleagues quantified HIV transcripts in cells from the blood and rectum of HIV-infected individuals effectively treated with antiretroviral drugs.The researchers found that different mechanisms block HIV transcription and underlie HIV latency in CD4+ T cells in the blood and gut. Moreover, the findings suggest that the rectum may be enriched for latently infected cells, or cells in a deeper state of latency. These differences in the blocks to HIV transcription are important to consider in designing therapies that aim to disrupt HIV latency in all tissue compartments. In particular, infected cells in the rectum may be less susceptible to agents designed to reverse latency or may require different types of therapies. Scanning electron micrograph of HIV-1 budding (in green) from cultured lymphocyte. This image has been colored to highlight important features; see PHIL 1197 for original black and white view of this image. Multiple round bumps on cell surface represent sites of assembly and budding of virions. Credit: CDC / C. Goldsmith, P. Feorino, E. L. Palmer, W. R. McManus. CC BY 0 Source:https://www.plos.orgcenter_img Nov 16 2018Mechanisms that govern HIV transcription and latency differ in the gut and blood, according to a study published November 15 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Steven Yukl of San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues. According to the authors, the findings could inform new therapies aimed at curing HIV.last_img read more

Ebola virus identified in a West African bat

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 24 2019The government of Liberia, in partnership with the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and EcoHealth Alliance, announced the discovery of Ebola virus in a bat in Liberia. This is the first finding of Zaire ebolavirus in a bat in West Africa, adding to other evidence suggesting bats serve as a natural wildlife reservoir for Ebola and other related viruses. Scientists found both genetic material from the virus and ebolavirus antibodies in a Greater Long-fingered bat (Mineopterus inflatus) in Liberia’s northeastern Nimba District. CII has been working to identify and characterize novel viruses at the intersection of humans and animals, on a global scale, for more than three decades. This work is a part of the USAID PREDICT project, which aims to better understand the animal reservoirs, seasonality, and transmission of viruses that can cause epidemic diseases.This is the first identification of Ebola virus in a bat in West Africa. There are six species of Ebola virus and Zaire ebolavirus is the one responsible for causing the West African Ebola epidemic which infected nearly 30,000 people between 2013 and 2016. Researchers at CII are working to determine whether the strain found in the bat is exactly the same one associated with the 2013-2016 outbreak. The evidence so far from about 20 percent of the virus’ genome suggests that it is closely related. Zaire ebolavirus is also responsible for the ongoing outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo, which is now the second deadliest Ebola outbreak in history.No human cases of Ebola are linked to this discovery and Liberia has remained free of any new human cases since the 2013-2016 outbreak. However, this finding brings us closer to understanding where human Ebola cases come from.”There have been unanswered questions about the source of Ebola outbreaks. There was speculation that they may have originated from bats, but there was no direct evidence,” says Simon Anthony, D.Phil, assistant professor of Epidemiology in the Center for Infection and Immunity at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, who led the laboratory discovery. “A critical element in this discovery, was VirCapSeq-VERT, a tool invented at the CII that improves the sensitivity of next generation sequencing 1,000-fold. It is possible that there are also other bat species that carry Ebola. Going forward, we will be analyzing additional specimens to fill in the picture.””This discovery is a major step forward in understanding how Ebola outbreaks happen,” says EcoHealth Alliance Vice President for Science and Outreach Jonathan Epstein, DVM. Epstein also serves as the lead for USAID-PREDICT in Liberia. “The West African Ebola epidemic was devastating, and it began with a single transmission from an animal to a person. It’s critical that we identify which animals naturally carry Ebola and related viruses – without knowing that, we can’t truly understand and reduce the risk of another outbreak occurring in the region.”The search for wildlife hosts for filoviruses like Ebola is a part of USAID’s PREDICT project, an international initiative to conduct surveillance and build local capacity to detect novel and known zoonotic viruses in nature so that countries are better prepared to prevent and respond to outbreaks. Partners in the discovery include EcoHealth Alliance; the Society for the Conservation of Nature, Liberia; the National Public Health Institute of Liberia; the Forest Development Authority; the Liberian Ministry of Agriculture; and Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health; and the University of California, Davis, which leads the PREDICT Consortium.Ebola is a zoonotic disease transmitted from wild animals to humansRelated StoriesVirus employs powerful strategy to inhibit natural killer cell functionPhoseon exhibits KeyPro KP100 UV LED instrument for virus inactivation at World Vaccine CongressResearchers compare American, Pacific and Southeast Asian subtypes of Zika virusEbola virus belongs to the Filoviridae family which also includes the Marburg and Cueva viruses. Like other zoonotic diseases (SARS, influenza, and rabies), Ebola virus is harbored by a natural animal reservoir, in Ebola’s case believed to include one or more species of bat, based on previous scientific studies. Prior Ebola outbreaks in Central Africa have been associated with deforestation and bushmeat hunting, where human cases were linked to contact with and consumption of chimpanzees, gorillas, and duikers that were infected. These animals were also victims of Ebola virus and it’s still a mystery as to exactly how they were infected. However, there is substantial evidence that filoviruses, such as Ebola and Marburg virus, are carried by bats. Marburg virus was recently discovered for the first time in Sierra Leone in its known bat reservoir, but it has historically been difficult to identify bats infected with Ebola virus.Bats play a critical role in ecosystems around the world, by removing pest insect species and pollinating fruiting trees, for example. The finding of Ebola virus in a bat should not be taken as a reason to exterminate, remove or harass bats in their natural environment. In fact, previous work shows that efforts to remove wildlife populations can lead to enhanced disease spread.”The government of Liberia has been not only a committed partner, but is working proactively to prevent further Ebola infections in the country,” says EcoHealth Alliance President Dr. Peter Daszak. “When we shared this discovery with them, they mobilized immediately to share these findings with their citizens. For the government to now be able to offer specific guidance so as to protect people’s health is critical. Past experience has shown that simply telling people not to eat bats is neither practical nor effective. Helping them live safely with bats is.”Keeping local communities safeGreater Long-fingered bats are found in parts of West Africa and other regions. They are an agriculturally important species in the area, as they eat insects which do damage to crops. Additionally, they do not tend to roost in homes or buildings, as some bats do. Instead they are found in forests, caves, and mines which makes preventing contact with them easier by avoiding entering caves or mines. The Liberian government is working to engage local communities about this finding to help reduce the possible risk of exposure and educate people about the positive impacts of bat species on pest control and the environment.Moving forwardFurther testing is underway to determine whether or not the virus detected in this bat is the same strain which caused the West African Ebola epidemic. The PREDICT team is also working with partners to understand how commonly these bats or other bat species may be infected with Ebola virus and whether there are any seasonal patterns to infection in bats, all of which helps understand risk to people and will inform public health strategies designed to prevent another Ebola outbreak.”This discovery is the result of an extraordinarily productive partnership between the government of Liberia, CII, EcoHealth Alliance, and UC Davis,” says Ian Lipkin, MD, director of CII. “It builds on years of investment and methods established under the auspices of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in biodefense and emerging infectious diseases.”Source: https://www.mailman.columbia.edu/last_img read more

Particle receivers to get first commercial trial—in Saudi Arabia

Testing heats up at Sandia’s Solar Tower with high temperature falling particle receiver This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Provided by SolarPACES What is the advantage of particle receivers?Particle receiver technology has the potential to reduce the cost of tower CSP, because it can nearly double today’s power tower temperatures, which top out in molten salt technology at 565°C.High temperatures increase efficiency, making particle receivers a good fit with high efficiency supercritical CO2 and air-breathing Brayton power cycles, and enable solar to replace fossil fuels in high-temperature thermochemical processes like splitting water to extract hydrogen at 800°C or make carbon-neutral solar fuels like jet fuels at 1,300°C.Researchers have investigated many materials for the particles. The advantage of sand is cost. At 5 MW, this particle receiver design would cycle more than 2000 tons of sand through its system.”We’re excited about sand because it doesn’t matter how much you need, the cost is almost nothing,” he pointed out. At scale, some materials, particularly engineered particles, could become a considerable fraction of initial costs. “When you are talking about thousands of tons of an engineered material, that can become prohibitive at some point.”Al-Ansary presented the paper on the results of the red sand tests in particle receiver tower CSP at the 23rd SolarPACES Conference in Chile.How the particle receiver worksAt a 20 MW-electrical scale, the receiver aperture would be about 10 meters wide by 10 meters tall and sand would be fed from the hopper to fall in a curtain a few cm thick through a 10 to 15 meter wide slot, exposing the sand particles to the heat of 1000 suns of intensely focused sunlight from a solar field of mirrors reflecting sunlight into the receiver aperture.Unlike the energy storage tanks in molten salt CSP, the hot and cold storage tanks could be stacked right inside the receiver tower along with the heat exchanger, so there is much less pumping of storage material, reducing parasitic costs.For a 20 MW plant, the tower would be about 150 meters tall and about 30 meters in diameter with the storage tanks stacked vertically inside. The discharge point of the cold tank would be about half way up the tower, “so we only need to lift the particles from the middle to the top to heat them.”The sand particles never fall fast, thanks to chevron-shaped obstacles that slow their descent, an innovation previously tested at Sandia in the US by the international research group. Without the obstacles, sand accelerates to 5 or 6 meters per second, even in just a 1 meter drop height.The obstructed flow maintains a dense curtain of particles everywhere in the receiver, so that all the concentrated radiation is absorbed by the falling particles.With particles slowed by the chevrons, Al-Ansary’s group got results of about 1,000°C in the lab without the sand agglomerating, and even out in the field, attained temperatures above 700°C.”The world’s first commercial particle receiver will be in 2018In a research field filled with innovation in much needed solar technologies, but not nearly equally visionary commercial support, the particle receiver research group is very fortunate to have backing ready to go.The Saudi Electricity Company is banking on building the world’s first commercial particle receiver, with the planning phase expected to start in the middle of 2018, following final prototype testing in January and February.”They said they are actually preparing for the next phase which is maybe around 5 MW. They would like it to be generating and they would like to sell that electricity,” he said.”Once we complete testing on KSU’s small 100 kW-electrical facility, and as soon as the results from this facility are confirmed, they are ready to go.”Saudi Electricity Company engineers have even been involved in helping with the research, and there will be an opportunity to tweak the engineering at scale.”We’ve actually had some engineers from the utility working with us on a daily basis on this project so it is really a joint effort, just making sure that we have a mature design such that when we go to the third phase it will be fully commercial.”Sandia has a much larger solar field, which was crucial and very useful in early testing, but the Riyadh test facility was small enough to be dedicated to a complete demonstration as a fully integrated power system with a heat exchanger and a gas turbine system – and a first adopter.Remote Arabian settlements need 1 GW worth of small projectsAway from Riyadh, parts of Saudi Arabia have an ideal solar resource for CSP (annual DNI of 2,600) the form of solar which needs clear skies. And many remote regions lack grid power.”Our national utility is excited about this idea because they have many remote areas that are not served by the grid, where 5 or 10 MW is more than enough,” said Al-Ansary. “They told me that the potential just within Saudi Arabia for those areas is roughly a thousand megawatts (1,000 MW). So they can build about 200 of these plants.”A 5 MW gas turbine that is adaptable to operation with hot compressed air, not steam like a molten salt system, is available commercially. This type of turbine has been tested in the EU using a direct gas heating receiver. This proven design is compatible with the PHR-CSP concept with little modification.The calm confidence with which Al-Ansary described each step from research to the impending commercialization was unusual. Even though clean technology innovation is absolutely crucial to a livable planet, such access to easy transition is rare. Al-Ansary confirmed it.”Indeed, we are lucky to have this support,” he agreed. Citation: Particle receivers to get first commercial trial—in Saudi Arabia (2018, January 22) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-particle-commercial-trialin-saudi-arabia.html Explore further Particle receiver diagram. Credit: Sandia A new solar technology is twice as efficient, cutting the cost of solar thermal energy, by raising operating temperatures to 1,000°C, almost twice the 565°C molten salt temperature in current concentrated solar power (CSP) tower plants. For most innovative research in clean energy, the dreaded “Valley of Death” after lab scale success is the sad place where great innovations go to die for lack of commercial trials.But that will not be the case for particle heating receiver technology (PHR) that was first conceptualized at Sandia National Laboratories and is now being researched worldwide.PHR is cutting edge technology for tower CSP, a form of solar that converts the sun’s heat to power. CSP with thermal energy storage is an important key to powering a carbon-constrained future, because its thermal storage enables solar generation at any time of day or night.PHR skips the “valley of death”There is an unobstructed path from lab to commercialization for Hany Al-Ansary, Professor in Mechanical Engineering at King Saud University (KSU) and international collaborators investigating one alternative approach using a red sand abundantly available near Riyadh in Saudi Arabia.The KSU approach relies on the sand flowing through a cavity receiver in the tower, while other promising approaches use different particles in free fall, or in an enclosed receiver.Saudi Arabia will be first to commercialize particle receiver technologyThe Saudi Electricity Company (SEC) is funding and assisting with the research into using the red sand approach for heat absorption in PHRs, and intends to enter the planning phase of a commercial trial in 2018. This sort of commercial support and trial is essential to developing technologies.Like molten salts, sand loses less than 1% of its stored energy daily, but it can achieve a temperature almost twice as high. This is the main reason for the interest in particle receivers, according to Al-Ansary, who holds 15 patents and has published in peer-reviewed journals.”Molten salt is limited to around 565°C,” he said. “but depending on which type of particles, you can get much higher temperatures, up to 1,000°C. Our group worked on different containment structure designs, and with simple masonry materials and a well-insulated tank, we reduced heat loss to under 1% per day, similar to molten salt.” read more

Ryanair announces preliminary deal with Italian staff

first_img Citation: Ryanair announces preliminary deal with Italian staff (2018, September 14) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-09-ryanair-preliminary-italian-staff.html © 2018 AFP Ryanair workers are demanding better working conditions and want their contracts to be based on the law in their country of residence rather than in Ireland Budget airline Ryanair announced on Friday that it has reached an agreement with flight crew unions in Italy to provide employment contracts under Italian law. Explore furthercenter_img Ryanair recognises cabin crew union in Ireland In a press release, Ryanair said agreements had been signed “in principle” with unions FIT-CISL, ANPAC and ANPAV in Rome on Thursday.Also on Thursday, Italian crews, alongside their Belgian, Dutch, Spanish and Portugese counterparts announced a 24-hour stoppage on September 28 that unions said would be the biggest strike in the Irish carrier’s history.With confirmation of the agreement between Ryanair and the Italian crews—set to come into effect on October 1 for a period of three years—their participation in the forthcoming strike is unclear, with union leaders currently leading consultation on the matter.According to unions, the agreement will allow for crews to work under contracts composed under Italian law rather than Irish legislation, addressing a key demand from staff.Provisions are also in place for salary increases and a pension scheme.Ryanair and union leaders have yet to fine-tune some details for the collective agreement expected to be signed by the end of September.”This agreement is a further sign of the significant progress Ryanair is making in reaching agreements with our people and their unions in different EU countries”, Ryanair’s chief of personnel Eddie Wilson said in a statement.Ryanair has already reached an agreement with cabin crew in Ireland and the United Kingdom, but negotiations remain mired in difficulty in other countries.On Wednesday, the company faced strike action from German pilot and cabin crew unions that resulted in the cancellation of 150 flights.Wilson said that “smaller unions” outside the negotiations process are threatening strikes that “will either not take place or be unsuccessful”. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Researchers charge ahead on battery storage

first_img Credit: Queensland University of Technology “A battery industry for Australian can go from mining, to usage and even to export,” Professor Talbot said.”Battery technologies give you energy security. Storage capability allows you to call on renewable energy any time of the day or night.””The CRC will be looking at doing it all in Australia – mine it, value add it, produce the components, make the batteries as I’ve shown in the example at QUT with our plant, put together the storage packs and then integrate it all with the power companies. QUT researchers will lead key research projects in expanding Australia’s battery industry from mining to manufacturing, with the announcement of the Future Battery Industries Cooperative Research Centre. Explore further Citation: Researchers charge ahead on battery storage (2019, April 11) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-battery-storage.html The Future Battery Industries CRC will involve 58 industry, government and research partners, and has the backing of a $25 million grant from the Federal Government and more than $110 million in support from the research centre’s partners.The CRC, which will help tackle industry-identified gaps in the battery industries value chain, will focus on three research programs: battery industry development; the processing of minerals; metals and materials for batteries and the development of a new battery storage system.Professor Peter Talbot from QUT’s Institute for Future Environments, who last year produced Australia’s first lithium-ion battery at QUT’s pilot plant precinct at Banyo, will lead the research program into battery materials and storage system development.The QUT Power Engineering Group will also be involved in activities around development of batteries into the grid and connecting to remote communities and industries.QUT will also contribute relevant research expertise in business innovation, industry transformation, socio-economic research.Professor Talbot said battery technology was vital, giving the examples of a $2000 smartphone that was just a brick without a battery or an electric car that could not leave the driveway without an energy storage system.Professor Talbot said Australia had the resources and skills to produce the “whole picture” of battery technology. “It’s about a whole industry.”The CRC, which will fund 40 Ph.D. students, will be based at Curtin University.Future Battery Industries CRC Chair Mr Tim Shanahan said the consortium had a six-year plan to address industry-identified gaps in the battery industries value chain.”Given Australia’s abundant resources of battery minerals and world-class resources sector, the potential to promote the nation’s premium-quality, ethically sourced and safe battery minerals and metals through forensic-accredited and traceable sources will also be investigated, paving the way for Australia to position itself as a global leader in the international battery value chain,” Mr Shanahan said.Australia is the world’s largest miner of lithium. Exports of lithium have risen from $117 million in 2012 to $780 million in 2017, and are expected to rise to $1.1 billion by next year.Nathan Cammerman, executive director of Queensland-based company Multicom Resources Ltd, said the research centre “sends a clear signal to our international partners, and the broader global market, that when it comes to raw material supply, battery technology development and its subsequent manufacture and deployment, Australia is clearly open for business.”center_img Professor Peter Talbot will lead the CRC’s research program on battery materials. Credit: Queensland University of Technology Making green cars greener with battery recycling Provided by Queensland University of Technology This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Fantastically Preserved Viking Boat Grave and Skeletons Unearthed in Sweden

first_img Photos: 10th-Century Viking Tomb Unearthed in Denmark Editor’s Note: This article was updated to correct the fact that “clinker” boats meant the boats were made of overlapping wooden planks. Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 minute and see why everyone is addictedVikings: Free Online GameUndoMarie Claire | HanacureMeet The Beauty Equivalent To TIME’s Person Of The Year AwardMarie Claire | HanacureUndoClassmatesSearch For Any High School Yearbook, It’s Free.ClassmatesUndoDr. Marty Nature's Feast Freeze-Dried RAW Cat Food3 Signs Something’s Wrong Inside Your Cat’s BodyDr. Marty Nature’s Feast Freeze-Dried RAW Cat FoodUndoPrimeSolarQuotesCalifornia Signs Solar Law Helping Homeowners Save Hundreds A Month.PrimeSolarQuotesUndoComparisons.orgCalifornia Drivers With No Tickets In 3 Years Must Read ThisComparisons.org Photos: Vikings Accessorized with Tiny Metal Dragons Fierce Fighters: 7 Secrets of Viking Seamen Archaeologists recently unearthed two Viking burial boats in Uppsala, Sweden — one of which was exceptionally preserved and held the remains of a dog, a man and a horse. The Vikings sent a handful of their powerful elites to the afterlife in boats laden with sacrificed animals, weapons and treasure; the funeral practice dates back to the Iron Age (A.D. 550 to 800) but was used throughout the Viking age (A.D. 800 to 1050), according to a statement. These richly appointed graves have been discovered across Scandinavia. For example, archaeologists had previously found one such burial boat in Norway that had evidence of human remains and one in western Scotland that contained a slew of burial items such as an ax, a shield boss, a ringed pin, a hammer and tongs. The elites who were given such elaborate send-offs were also often buried with animals, such as stallions.These Sharks Were Too Busy to Notice a Bigger Predator Watching ThemThe unexpected twist at the end of this feeding frenzy delighted scientists.Credit: NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Windows to the Deep 2019Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really Loud00:35关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65892-viking-burial-boats-discovered-sweden.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0002:2802:28  These burial boats were typically built with overlapping wooden planks (called “clinker built”) and had symmetrical ends, a true keel and overlapping planks joined together, said Johan Anund, the regional manager for The Archaeologists, an archeological organization working with the National Historical Museums in Sweden. Archaeologists have also found other, simpler boat structures, such as logboats, which are like a dugout wide canoe, Anand told Live Science in an email. [Photos: A Man, a Horse and a Dog Found in Viking Boat Burials] The remains of the dog and the horse were nestled in the bow of the well-preserved boat, while the remains of the man were found in the stern. “We don’t know much” about the man yet, Anund said. But analysis of the skeleton will reveal how old he was, how tall he was and if he had any injuries or diseases. Anund’s group may even be able to figure out where the man grew up and where he lived for most of his life, Anund said. As for the animals buried with him, they could have been sacrificed to help the dead person on the “other side” but could also be there to show the man’s status and rank, Anund said. It’s common to find horses and dogs in such burials, but also big birds like falcons. Archaeologists also found other items on the boat such as a sword, spear, shield, an ornate comb, and leftover wood and iron nails that were likely used in its construction. The other boat was badly damaged, probably because a 16th-century medieval cellar was built right on top of it, according to the statement. Some human and animal bones were still preserved on the damaged ship, but they seem to have been moved around, making it difficult for archaeologists to say much about them, Anund said. Archaeologists discovered the ships, the well and the cellar after a plot of land outside Uppsala was marked off to become a new building for the vicarage of Gamla Uppsala parish. They excavated the boats last month and some of the finds will go on display at Gamla Uppsala museum and the Swedish History Museum in Stockholm. Live Science Editor-in-Chief Jeanna Bryner contributed to this story.last_img read more

Data war between TDP YSR Congress heats upData war between TDP YSR

first_imgTelangana Published on The ongoing ‘data war’ between the ruling Telugu Desam Party (TDP) and the main opposition party YSR Congress in Andhra Pradesh has touched the peak with raid on IT Grids, an IT company in Hyderabad, which provides services to the ruling TDP as well as the AP government. The Telangana police raided the company and seized floppies and other material last weekend on the basis of a complaint lodged by an apparent whistle-blower having close connections with YSR Congress leaders. The charge was that private data belonging to the citizens of AP (Aadhar data, bank account details among others) was being misused by the company to serve the needs of the ruling TDP through the ‘Seva Mitra’ app launched by the party.Denying the allegations, TDP leaders said the YSR Congress and the Telangana Rashtra Samiti (TRS), supported by the BJP, have hatched a conspiracy to obtain data relating to the cadre and leaders of the TDP and leverage it for the upcoming Lok Sabha polls by staging a raid.. The drama has unfolded in Hyderabad, technically still the common capital of both the Telugu States, according to the AP Re-organisation Act, 2014, and what makes it interesting is the role being played by the ruling TRS. The TRS is an open friend of the YSR Congress and an avowed foe of the TDP, going by the recent statements of its leaders and political developments.KCR’s return giftThe raid on the IT firm in Hyderabad, alleges the TDP, is the promised “return gift” of KCR [to the YSR Congress]. But “it will only boomerang on the YSR Congress and TRS, if they adopt such vindictive tactics,” it adds. KCR had promised a return gift to the Andhra CM for campaigning against the TRS in Telangana during the Assembly polls last year. YS Jagan Mohan Reddy, the leader of the YSR Congress, met the common Governor of both the States in Hyderabad, ESL Narasimhan, and submitted a complaint against the ruling TDP over how “it had compromised the private data of citizens to achieve its political ends”. The votes of the YSR Congress cadre and sympathisers are being deleted from the voters’ lists on a large-scale and bogus voters are being included in the lists to suit the TDP, he alleged. The Telangana police issued a look-out notice against the CEO of the IT firm, and are going ahead with the investigation. The TDP on Wednesday night lodged a complaint with the Guntur rural police against the Telangana police”. COMMENTS YS Jagan Mohan Reddy The Telangana police issued a look-out notice against the CEO of the IT firm, and are going ahead with the investigationcenter_img COMMENT SHARE SHARE EMAIL March 07, 2019 SHARElast_img read more