Tag: 上海水磨论坛

Fans’ Asian PoTW – Kobayashi

first_imgAFC Champions League Fans’ Asian Player of the Week: Kawasaki Frontale’s Yu Kobayashi Last updated 2 years ago 23:52 8/29/17 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Yu Kobayashi AFC Champions League Kawasaki Frontale v Urawa Reds Urawa Reds Kawasaki Frontale The Japanese attacking midfielder’s display in the first leg of ACL quarterfinals has found favour with the fans who have voiced their approval.. Kawasaki Frontale’s attacking midfielder Yu Kobayashi has been chosen as last week’s Fans’ Asian Player of the Week, following his impressive performance in his team’s 3-1 win over Urawa Red Diamonds in the first leg of the AFC Champions League quarterfinal between the two teams. He starred with two goals as Kawasaki Frontale won 3-1, putting themselves at a huge advantage ahead of the second leg. The 29-year-old opened the scoring from 10 yards just after the half hour before heading home from close in with five minutes remaining to give his side a two-goal cushion ahead of the return fixture next month. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Brazil, beware! Messi and Argentina out for revenge after Copa controversy Best player in MLS? Zlatan wasn’t even the best player in LA! ‘I’m getting better’ – Can Man Utd flop Fred save his Old Trafford career? Why Barcelona god Messi will never be worshipped in the same way in Argentina Also in the fray for the honour were Shanghai SIPG winger Wu Lei and Al Ain goalkeeper Khalid Eisa – both of whom were impressive in their respective teams’ games this past week. The fans made their voice count as Yu Kobayashi received 60% of the votes while Wu Lei was backed by 30% of the voters. Eisa remained a distant third with just 10% votes to his name. Congrats Kobayashi! Yu Kobayashilast_img read more

10 months agoMinotti warns Cagliari midfielder Nicolo Barella against Chelsea move

first_imgMinotti warns Cagliari midfielder Nicolo Barella against Chelsea moveby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer Italy international Lorenzo Minotti has warned Cagliari midfielder Nicolo Barella against a move to Chelsea.Minotti, who used to play for Cagliari, has questioned whether Barella would get a game with the Blues.He told TMW: “Risk of a [Marco] Verratti-situation? The Premier [League] is a competitive championship.”Now the Italian teams are not ready to spend a similar amount, and those with chances [to] have [full squads].”If he goes to Chelsea he will struggle to find a starting shirt and be ready for the national team.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

a month agoHector Bellerin enjoys full 90 for Arsenal U23 in Liverpool draw

first_imgHector Bellerin enjoys full 90 for Arsenal U23 in Liverpool drawby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal fullback Hector Bellerin completed 90 minutes as they came from two goals down to draw with Liverpool at Meadow Park.The Spaniard came close to an opener when he drove through the visitors’ defence and fired a shot at goal but Ben Winterbottom saved well at his near post. Matt Macey then made a brilliant recovery save to keep out Rhian Brewster’s looping header from close range.Liverpool’s pressure paid off when Curtis Jones tapped in following Luis Longstaff’s low cross.The second then came when Jones met another Longstaff cross to head home. The Gunners were back in it on the stroke of half-time when Nathan Tormey beat the offside trap to slot the ball past Winterbottom.Early in the second half Folarin Balogun levelled the scores when he made no mistake from close range following Bellerin’s low cross. About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Indigenous students student union push Ryerson University to change its name

first_imgTORONTO – A student-led campaign at Ryerson University is pushing for the school to change its name out of respect for residential school survivors.But the proposal from the Ryerson Students Union and the Indigenous Students Association has prompted considerable backlash from the wider student community, who criticize it as being impractical and disrespectful in its own right.The downtown Toronto university is named for Egerton Ryerson, a pioneer of public education in Ontario who is widely believed to have helped shape residential school policy through his ideas on education for Indigenous children.The school has previously stated that Ryerson’s ideas did help contribute to the system that has since been described as a “cultural genocide” and acknowledged the need to commit to respectful relationships with Indigenous students.The request for a name change is one of 11 demands the students union posted on its Facebook page on Canada Day under the hashtag #resist150.Others include removing a statue of Ryerson that currently stands on campus, creating an Indigenous-only space for students, and implementing mandatory Indigenous content in all programs.But the demands have sparked controversy both in and out of the union.Union president Susanne Nyaga said at least one executive member has expressed a desire to rethink his position on the issue, and the union itself may have to revise its stance after further discussions.Students outside the union, meanwhile, have decried the idea of changing the school’s name. They’ve pointed out the financial costs of a major rebranding, expressed concerns that changing the name could pose problems for previous graduates who hold a Ryerson diploma, and argued that expunging Egerton Ryerson’s name and likeness from campus is not a sound way of acknowledging a dark episode in Canada’s history.“The statue must remain, and the name of the school,” wrote one Facebook poster identifying herself as Indigenous. “Why? It’s the history of the school. You do not have to agree with it, but it is the history of what people back then were thinking. It is a reminder…No ones hands are clean when it comes to the history of Canada.”The demand that drew perhaps the highest number of critical or derisive comments states that the school should “change the name of Ryerson University to a name that does not celebrate a man who supported and created the structures of colonial genocide.”Other demands include implementing three specific recommendations from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, as well as more modest ideas such as hosting at least one annual powwow per year and encouraging the adoption of the orange shirt campaign to commemorate residential school survivors.Nyaga said it was Indigenous student groups on campus that initiated the campaign, not the union itself, which operates independently of Ryerson University despite being funded by student dollars. She said those groups have long considered Egerton Ryerson’s legacy as problematic.“These conversations have been happening amongst Indigenous students for years,” she said. “The difference is that the RSU is supporting Indigenous students and standing in solidarity with them this time.”But solidarity is not yet established internally, she acknowledged, saying the next union board meeting on July 19 will likely feature some discussion of the issue. It is possible that the union may wind up withdrawing its support for the demands, she said, adding that she personally supports them all.The university said in a statement that it was looking forward to hearing the union’s concerns so they could work together productively.“Ryerson University values the equitable, intentional and ongoing engagement of equity, diversity and inclusion within every facet of university life,” the statement said. “As always, we invite any students or student groups with concerns to contact university administration directly.”The school had previously acknowledged the problematic legacy of its namesake.In October 2010, the school issued a statement describing Egerton Ryerson as someone who believed in different systems of education for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children.“These beliefs influenced, in part, the establishment of what became the Indian Residential School system that has had such a devastating impact on First Nations, Métis and Inuit people across Canada,” the statement said. “While Egerton Ryerson did not implement or oversee Indian Residential Schools, his ideas were used by others to create their blueprint. It is important to acknowledge this connection and in so doing emphasize the university’s ongoing and proactive commitment to respectful relationships with Aboriginal communities.”This is the second time in recent weeks that the names of residential school architects have come under scrutiny.Late last month, the name of founding father Hector-Louis Langevin was stripped from the building that houses the Prime Minister’s Office on Parliament Hill.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the government was responding to feedback that there was “deep pain” associated with seeing the name on a government building.He said the building would now simply be called the Office of the Prime Minister and the Privy Council.last_img read more

Equifax to update Canadians this week still mum on number impacted by

first_imgTORONTO – Equifax Canada said Monday it plans to provide an update this week on the impact of its massive data breach — nearly two months after it was first discovered — but would not say how many individuals north of the border may have had their personal information compromised.The credit data company told The Canadian Press that it is working with Canada’s privacy watchdog, which announced an investigation into the cyberattack on Friday.“We intend to share an update with Canadians this week that will include how we intend to notify any potentially impacted individuals,” an Equifax Canada spokesperson said in an email. “Our investigation is ongoing and we are committed to sharing an update with Canadian consumers.”Canada’s privacy commissioner said Friday that Equifax has committed to contacting Canadians whose data may be at risk, in writing, as soon as possible, and to provide them with free credit monitoring, a service that was offered to U.S. residents on Sept. 7, the day it first announced the data breach.The company is now facing investigations in both Canada and the U.S., but lawyers say the punitive threat by regulators is stronger south of the border.Equifax, which collects data about consumers’ credit histories and provides credit checks to a variety of companies, has been tight-lipped about the security issue’s impact in Canada.Equifax Canada did not respond to questions about the number of Canadians who may have had their personal information stolen or whether the potential fallout is limited to Canadians with credit files in the U.S.The credit monitoring company’s call centre staff have told callers that only Canadians that have dealings in the U.S. were likely to be impacted by the data breach. However, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner said on Friday that, at this point, it is not clear that the affected data was limited to those Canadians.Equifax said on Sept. 7 that it suffered a massive cyberattack in the summer that may have compromised the personal data of 143 million Americans and an undisclosed number of Canadian and U.K. residents.The credit data company has since said that fewer than 400,000 U.K. individuals may have been affected in the hack that was discovered on July 29.Equifax’s Canadian website says that the personal information that may have been breached includes names, addresses and social insurance numbers.The Federal Trade Commission in the U.S. can issue hefty fines if the credit monitoring company is found to have failed to do enough to protect consumers’ data, but Canada’s privacy watchdog does not have the power to hand down fines, said Toronto-based cybersecurity and privacy lawyer Lyndsay Wasser of McMillan LLP.Instead, the privacy commissioner can make non-binding recommendations and sign an agreement urging them to comply, she added.Tamir Israel, a staff lawyer with the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic in Ottawa, pointed to the hacking of Canadian affair-seeking website Ashley Madison, which paid $1.6 million US to settle with the FTC but was not fined in Canada.However, Wasser said an application could also be made to a federal court — either by the privacy commissioner or by an individual — for a process in which a judge could award damages to those who have suffered as a result of a data breach.The company could also face punitive measures via class actions. At least two proposed class actions have been filed in Canada against Equifax in connection with the data breach.Under Canada’s Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, personal information should be protected by security safeguards that are appropriate for the sensitivity of the information, Wasser added.However, Canada’s privacy laws do not specify the measures that must be taken and even when a company has been hacked, it may still pass the “reasonableness test,” she said.“That’s the million dollar question: What is reasonable?… Even if they did comply with industry standards, it could still be found that further precaution should have been taken,” Wasser said.On Friday, Equifax said in a statement that the cyberattack occurred through a vulnerability in an open-source application framework it uses called Apache Struts. The United States Computer Readiness team detected and disclosed the vulnerability in March, and Equifax “took efforts to identify and to patch any vulnerable systems in the company’s IT infrastructure.”Meanwhile, changes to PIPEDA that would require companies to notify people in the event of a serious data breach are in the final stages, with the proposed text of the regulations out for public consultation until Oct. 2. But until those come into force, Alberta is the only province in Canada that has mandatory reporting requirements for private-sector companies.Israel said federal breach notification laws are “critical.”“There is going to be a strong internal incentive to make sure you have a very complete PR strategy before you start telling people what’s going on, but people need to know right away.”Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version misspelled Lyndsay Wasser.last_img read more

Deep freeze offers only cold comfort for natural gas producing firms

first_imgCALGARY – Analysts say the cold snap that continues to blanket many parts of North America is driving short-term natural gas prices higher but the trend is unlikely to significantly affect either Canadian consumer bills or producer profits.Cold weather typically increases demand for the home heating fuel, which draws down storage levels and pushes prices higher, but the affect is being blunted this year because North America is awash in gas from U.S. and Canadian shale wells.Gerry Goobie, a principal with Calgary-based consulting company Gas Processing Management Inc., says higher prices are generally passed through to consumers but the distribution companies that buy the gas have long-term contracts to mitigate price spikes and can draw from storage to handle higher demand.GMP FirstEnergy commodity analyst Martin King says U.S. prices have recently rallied to about $3 per million British thermal units, but points out similar cold weather events in previous years would likely have resulted in prices spiking into the US$4 or US$5 per mmBTU range.King says Western Canada gas production fell by as much as two billion cubic feet per day on some days in the last week of December due to supply interruptions caused by extreme cold weather that froze gas well production equipment.last_img read more

Province to help fund homeless count in Fort St John

first_imgThe homeless count will occur over a span of 24 hours, beginning the night before April 18th and will include counts in shelters, RCMP holding cells, hospitals, and other known places where at-risk individuals stay overnight. During the day, the same procedure will occur; with mechanisms in place to avoid duplicating persons who have been counted already.Each person that is counted will be asked to complete a survey about their living situation to highlight needs for at-risk individuals, which can give feedback on potential future funding to help combat homelessness. The survey’s full results should be publicly available several months after the count is completed.The Fort St. John Women’s Resource Society is currently searching for volunteers to help with this year’s homeless count. Each volunteer must be available the day of the count, and for a training session that is taking place the evening of Tuesday, April 10th. A survey has been created to identify the commitments of each volunteer best and can be found at the following link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/FSJ2018.The Province is investing $550,000 to fund the counts in the 12 communities and plans to report on the preliminary results by early summer. The Homelessness Action Plan is expected to be released later this year. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Province will coordinate homeless counts in up to 12 communities around B.C. including here in Fort St. John.The Fort St. John Women’s Resource Society announced earlier this month; they would take on coordinate Fort St. John’s first-ever homeless count.Homeless counts provide vital information, including the demographics and service needs of people experiencing homelessness. They also help establish a benchmark to measure the progress made to reduce homelessness over time.  Staff from the Women’s Resource Society also appeared before Fort St. John City Council Monday to talk more about the plan and how the community can help.last_img read more

Jhargram Police launch Lakhyabhed to help students with competitive exams

first_imgKolkata: In a bid to provide a platform for students to perform well in the competitive examinations and gain employment, the Jhargram District Police has launched a new project named ‘Lakhyabhed’.The project that was officially launched on February 1 already has 150 students getting free coaching for preparation of different competitive examinations like West Bengal Civil Services, Public Service Commission, Railways, Staff Selection Commission and others. Also Read – Centuries-old Durga Pujas continue to be hit among revellersThe project, a brainchild of Superintendent of Police, Jhargram, Arijit Sinha, is a holistic approach to help aspiring students achieve their dreams of civil service and ensure employment for them. “Apart from free training we will be providing information of all competitive examinations, their syllabi, assist the candidates in filling up forms and provide logistics arrangement to take candidates to their respective examination centres. All the services will be provided free of cost,” said Kunwar Bhusan, Additional SP (Operations), Jhargram, who is the nodal officer of the project. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaClasses are held thrice a week on Friday, Saturday and Sunday at two separate centres – Binpur police station and Jhargram Raj College. The duration of the training will be six months. The selection of students was done police station wise, through a written screening test that was held on January 15 at two centres in the district. 20 students who had performed very well during the screening, were handed over competitive examination books, bags and other equipment needed for their examination, free of cost. “The entire cost of running the project is being borne from the community policing fund allocated by the state government,” a senior police officer in the district said. The senior police official said that anyone interested to teach or guide the students is welcome in the Lakhyabhed initiative. At present, senior police officials in the district and faculties from various institutions in the district are taking classes on the basis of their specialisation in subjects. “There is no fixed duration of the classes that vary from one hour to three hours, depending on the work schedule of the faculties,” the official added.last_img read more

Emery warns Arsenal not to underestimate opportunists Blackpool

first_imgArsenal manager Unai Emery is wary of taking the lowly Blackpool lightly ahead of Saturday’s FA Cup matchThe Spaniard, who replaced the competition’s most successful manager in Arsene Wenger last summer, will have his first FA Cup game at Bloomfield Road this weekend.Currently, Blackpool are 10th in the English third division and have had over 4,000 of their own supporters recently protest against the club’s owners.But, in light of their hard-fought 2-1 Carabao Cup win over Blackpool in November, Emery refuses to underestimate Terry McPhillips’ side.“When we played here against them in the Carabao Cup, we knew this history of this club,” said Emery on Arsenal.com.Premier LeaguePremier League Betting: Match-day 5 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Going into the Premier League’s match-day five with a gap already beginning to form at the top of the league. We will take a…“They aren’t in the best moment for that. But here against us at the Emirates they played very competitively and gave us a lot of difficult moments.“I have big respect for each team and I know they are one team now not in the best moment but the respect is there because it’s a very big opportunity for them to play against us with their supporters and live this important moment, finding the chances against us.Dinos Mavropanos and Emile Smith Rowe have returned to training at Arsenal but remain doubts for this Saturday.Shkodran Mustafi, Nacho Monreal, Hector Bellerin and Mesut Ozil also remain unlikely to return to competitive action after sitting out of yesterday’s team training session.last_img read more

Former Aston Villa player recalls relentlessly negative youth coach MacDonald

first_imgGareth Farrelly, who played at Aston Villa in the ’90s, is now an attorney at law and recalls the abuse players were subjected to under coach Kevin MacDonald.Gareth Farrelly, 43, touched on his time under coach Kevin MacDonald, the Aston Villa youth coach suspended over these new “bullying” claims. Farrelly says the time he spent at Villa was a “relentlessly negative” regime under MacDonald.“It was a culture of verbal and physical bullying, but there were no checks and balances; he operated with impunity. It was like a dark shadow came over,” Farrelly told the Guardian.Jose Mourinho is sold on Lampard succeeding at Chelsea Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 14, 2019 Jose Mourinho wanted to give his two cents on Frank Lampard’s odds as the new Chelsea FC manager, he thinks he will succeed.There really…“He would say: ‘You think you’re a f***ing player? You’re not a f***ing player. You’ve got f***ing no chance.’ He would be calling players ‘c**ts’ all the time; crazy stuff when you think about the role of responsibility he operated in.”“In training, it wasn’t unusual for people to end up squaring up to him, games would have to be stopped. It became normal. People were lucky not to have their legs broken. Every day you’d go into work, put your boots on, and think: ‘Here it comes again’. It took a huge toll.”last_img read more

Firefighters Helicopters Working On New Fire Outside Sterling

first_imgThis helicopter was diverted back when winds kicked up activity on the Swan Lake Fire burning in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, according to DOF officials. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Firefighters and helicopters are aggressively working on a half-acre fire burning southwest of the confluence of Killey and Kenai rivers. It was reported at 3:20pm, Sunday by firefighter personnel aboard an aircraft guiding water-scooping airplanes flying between Skilak Lake and the Swan Lake Fire. In a release from DOF, they are busy cutting in a saw line around the fire that is burning in heavy dead and downed trees from the 2014 Funny River Fire. Two helicopters were dropping large buckets of water on the fire, including one that was pulled from the nearby Swan Lake Fire. The Killey Fire is burning in a full protection area east of Browns Lake and to the west of the Killey River near Sterling.  A Division of Forestry Kenai – Kodiak Area helitack crew with four firefighters responded and three other Division of Forestry firefighters traveled by four wheelers to reach the fire. Firefighters reported the fire is burning deep underneath surface layers and was proving to be resistant to suppression. They will continue overnight into Monday  to work toward fully suppressing the fire.For more information, contact the Alaska Fire Information Office at (907)356-5511. More details will be posted as they are made available.last_img read more

Game of Thrones star Kit Harrington reveals Jon Snows future at end

first_imgKit Harington as Jon Snow with Liam Cunningham as Davos SeaworthHBOFans have been trying hard to put the disappointing final season of Game of Thrones behind them. But the cast keeps bringing it back up to the forefront of their minds.Reportedly, Game of Thrones star Kit Harington was asked about his character’s last moment on the show during a pre-Emmys chat with The Hollywood Reporter. Fans have apparently wondered about the finale of Game of Thrones, in which Snow — having been relegated back to the Night’s Watch — left Castle Black and was seen heading beyond the Wall. Was he was going on a ranging mission? Was he merely escorting the Free Folk? Or was he leaving the Night’s Watch behind and rejoining the Wildlings to live with them?Turns out, that final assumption (which, admittedly, was the most popular consensus online) is correct.  Jon Snow and Daenerys TargaryenGame of Thrones Official Facebook”[S]eeing him go beyond the Wall back to something true, something honest, something pure with these people he was always told he belongs with — the Free Folk — it felt to me like he was finally free,” said the actor, who is currently nominated for the Emmys’ Best Actor in a Drama Series award. “Instead of being chained and sent to the Wall, it felt like he was set free. It was a really sweet ending. As much as he had done a horrible thing [in killing Daenerys], as much as he had felt that pain, the actual ending for him was finally being released.”We have to say that no matter how much the cast still tries to defend the final season, there was no excuse for the final episodes of season eight.last_img read more

Whats Happening At The Border Heres What We Know About Immigrant Children

first_img Share Reynaldo Leal for The Texas TribuneImmigrant families seeking asylum in the United State wait on the Mexican side of the international bridge connecting Brownsville to Matamoros, Mexico.The attention of the nation has turned to Texas and its border with Mexico after the Trump administration enacted a policy that has resulted in undocumented children being separated from their parents. Here’s what we know:What’s happening at the border?In April, the federal government announced an immigration policy of “zero tolerance,” saying all adults who cross the border illegally between official ports of entry would be criminally prosecuted. Since children can’t be sent to jail, kids who were detained with their parents were being separated from them. While their parents went through the legal system, children were handed over to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Refugee Resettlement.In the last two months, at least 2,500 children were separated, The Washington Post has reported. The Trump administration tested the “zero tolerance” policy starting in October. The New York Times reported that, between October and April, more than 700 children were separated from adults claiming to be their parents. The reporting was based on data from the Office of Refugee Resettlement.As stories of children being separated from their parents have spread, outrage swelled across the political spectrum. On Wednesday, President Donald Trump signed an executive order saying the separations should stop. He directed that, “to the extent permitted by law,” immigrant families should be held together in immigration detention facilities run by the Department of Homeland Security.Soon after, the U.S. Border Patrol said it stopped referring migrants with children to courthouses for prosecution, effectively exempting families from the zero tolerance policy, according to the Washington Post. One possible reason: Under a legal settlement, children cannot be detained for more than 20 days, even if they are with their parents. But federal officials say it’s just a pause. The “zero tolerance” policy remains in play, they say. For now, the Trump order has brought an end to the practice of separating families and prosecuting migrant adults with children. But the president’s executive order asks the Department of Homeland Security to look for new ways to house immigrant families together and bypass the 2o-day detention limit.What will happen to the kids already separated from their parents?On June 26, a federal judge ordered immigration officials to reunite families within 30 days, according to the Washington Post. Children under 5 must be reunited with parents within 14 days and parents must be able to call their children within 10 days.ICE has released some plans that same day to reunite families so they “can be returned to their home countries together.” However, the government hasn’t outlined a plan to reunify parents and children who are seeking asylum and will stay in the country while their claims are processed.Some detained migrants were told they would be reunited with their children if they signed voluntary removal orders from the U.S. A Honduran man who spoke to the Texas Tribune on June 23 said he said a voluntary deportation agreement out of “desperation” to see his 6-year-old daughter.Southwest Key Programs, the Texas-based nonprofit that houses almost half of the undocumented children in federal custody, said it is keeping track of the location of parents. Children are allowed to be in contact with their parents, according to Alexia Rodriguez, the vice president of immigrant children’s services for Southwest Key.While children wait to be reunited with their parents, some immigrant toddlers are being ordered into court for deportation proceedings, according to Kaiser Health News. Requiring accompanied minors to go to court alone is not new, but the family separation policy means more young children are being affected.In what kind of conditions are the kids living?The shelters that house immigrant children have been accused of serious lapses in care, an investigation by Reveal and The Texas Tribune has found. In almost all cases, the federal government has continued to place children with the companies after serious allegations were raised.Allegations included failure to seek medical attention for children and “inappropriate contact between children and staff.”Federal authorities have let reporters and lawmakers into some facilities. Last week, federal authorities let a group of reporters tour a Brownsville center that used to be a Walmart.The number of kids staying at the shelter, which is called Casa Padre, doubled between April and May of this year, according to The Washington Post. The shelter houses about 1,500 boys, who attend school for six hours a day and spend two hours outside. The boys are allowed to make two phone calls a week. Officials who run the shelter say the average stay there is 49 days.Officials also let reporters tour a processing center in McAllen. U.S. Customs and Border Protection released video from the Central Processing Center. 2/ About 2,000 children have been separated from their parents at the border, but the actual number is likely higher. https://t.co/EVAs1l8u5q pic.twitter.com/U3gbPKBbeX— Texas Tribune (@TexasTribune) June 18, 2018Lawmakers toured the temporary shelter in Tornillo, a border city about 40 miles from El Paso, last week. After the tour, state Rep. Mary González, D-Clint, said there are doctors and caseworkers in the facility.3/ This comes after the Trump administration announced a “zero tolerance” policy. That means all adults crossing the border illegally will be prosecuted. Since children can’t be sent to federal jail, kids who are detained are being separated from parents. https://t.co/EVAs1l8u5q pic.twitter.com/kVvQ6sp9qa— Texas Tribune (@TexasTribune) June 18, 2018U.S. Rep. Will Hurd, R-Helotes, also toured the facility, and told Texas Monthly the temporary facility seems to be safe and well run.“They get three meals a day and snacks, it’s the same food that the staff eats,” Hurd told Texas Monthly. “There are fifty caseworkers that are working to get them placed with other family members.”What happens to families that cross the border now?Trump’s executive order made clear that he didn’t want to end the “zero tolerance” policy. But right now there is a lot of uncertainty about how those new cases will be handled. If the government wants to continue to detain families that crossed the border illegally, it will face logistical and legal hurdles. Right now, it isn’t referring those families for criminal prosecution.Migrant families can’t legally be detained for longer than 20 days. The Justice Department is asking a federal judge to amend the 2015 ruling that set the 20-day limit.If the Justice Department succeeds, the government will also have to find a place to house the detained families. Right now, there are three Immigration and Customs Enforcement facilities — two in Texas, one in Pennsylvania — that can house families. Their combined capacity is only about 3,000.Why did the Trump administration do this?U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the “zero tolerance” policy in April.“If you cross this border unlawfully, then we will prosecute you,” he said the following month. “It’s that simple. … If you are smuggling a child, then we will prosecute you and that child will be separated from you as required by law.”The policy was meant to deter immigrants from attempting to cross the border illegally. Sessions said President Trump won the 2016 election in part thanks to his tough stance on immigration.“If you want to change our laws, then pass a bill in Congress,” he said. “Persuade your fellow citizens to your point of view.”Trump, meanwhile, blamed Democrats.In a tweet early on in the crisis, he said, “Children are being used by some of the worst criminals on earth as a means to enter our country. Has anyone been looking at the Crime taking place south of the border. It is historic, with some countries the most dangerous places in the world. Not going to happen in the U.S.”What are lawmakers doing to address this?Lawmakers have scrambled to come up with some kind of solution. But it wasn’t been easy.The U.S. House rejected two immigration bills addressing border security and the status of “Dreamers.” Neither bill had Democratic support.  Meanwhile, both U.S. senators from Texas were working on legislation — maybe together. On June 19, U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, filed an emergency bill. A press release sent from his office says the legislation would double the number of federal immigration judges from roughly 375 to 750 and expedite review of asylum cases. In the meantime, temporary shelters would be authorized in order to house families together.The next day, Senate Republicans — including both U.S. senators from Texas — introduced the Keep Families Together and Enforce the Law Act, which would hold families together in detention centers run by the Department of Homeland Security as they await a court hearing.Lawmakers from both parties have said that legislative action is still needed, despite Trump’s order ending separations.   How are Texas lawmakers reacting?Many top statewide elected officials initially blamed Democrats for failing to work with Republicans on immigration reform. But as outrage swelled, they began to urge both parties to act.On Wednesday, Gov. Greg Abbott wrote a letter to Texans in Congress, asking them to take action and end family separation.“This disgraceful condition must end; and it can only end with action by Congress to reform the broken immigration system,” he wrote.Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, meanwhile, backed Trump’s actions.“The separation of families should never be a desired outcome and my heart goes out to these children being used as ‘pawns’ in a political debate… The Trump administration is following the law,” he said.Meanwhile, Democrats have been outraged. On Father’s Day, U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke, a Democrat from El Paso who is running for U.S. Senate, and former El Paso County Judge Veronica Escobar, who is running for Congress, led a protest at the Tornillo tent city. Six Democratic members of the Texas Legislature sent a letter to two federal agencies calling the tent cities “abhorrent and possibly illegal.”A growing number of Republicans are speaking out against the policy.Texas House Speaker Joe Straus, R-San Antonio, has opposed the policy from the start. He wrote a letter to President Trump asking him to end the “zero tolerance” policy.Laura Bush, the former first lady of the U.S. and of Texas, called the “zero tolerance” policy “cruel” in an op-ed published in The Washington Post.We asked every member of the Texas congressional delegation and other statewide officials if they support the “zero tolerance” policy. See how each one answered here.How did the Obama administration handle similar cases?The Obama administration drew criticism from immigration advocates for its 2015 policy of detaining mothers and children, but it released families from detention together.During a surge of undocumented immigration from Central America in 2014, a federal judge ruled that families were being held in “deplorable” conditions in Texas detention centers after crossing the border, according to previous Texas Tribune reporting. U.S. District Judge Dolly Gee gave the Obama administration about two months to release women and children in centers in Dilley and Karnes City, Texas.Homeland Security officials initially said they were detaining families to deter immigrants from illegally crossing the border, according to The New York Times. In February 2015, a federal court ruled that the children had to be released. In 2016, a judge ruled that a 20-day detention limit for children applied to families, too. Federal authorities then released many of those families and told them to return for their court dates.As this story develops and we have more information, we’ll continue to answer your questions. To submit questions about what’s happening at the border, email texplainer@texastribune.org. Follow The Texas Tribune on Twitter or our list of journalists covering the policy for updates.last_img read more