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INISHOWEN’S NEW BISHOP IS FROM ANTRIM

first_imgBREAKING NEWS: THE new Bishop of Derry has been chosen from outside the ranks of local clergy.The Auxiliary Bishop of Down and Conor Donal McKeown has been appointed the new Bishop of the diocese which covers Inishowen.The announcement was made in Derry a short time ago. The 64 year old is meeting the Press in the city now to discuss his new appointment.Born in Belfast, the 63-year-old succeeds Dr Seamus Hegarty who retired as Bishop of Derry in late 2011.Dr McKeown is a former president of Saint Malachy’s College, Belfast.He is fluent in German and Italian and he has a working knowledge of French and Polish. Dr McKeown is also a regular contributor, both north and south, to radio and television as well as having opinion articles published in newspapers and periodicals.INISHOWEN’S NEW BISHOP IS FROM ANTRIM was last modified: February 25th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

ReadWriteMix Recap: How To Beat The Giants And Build A Company That Lasts

first_imgTags:#IPO#Keith Rabois#Khosla Ventures#LinkedIn#PayPal#ReadWrite Mix#ReadWriteMix#tech stocks#Xoom#yelp A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… owen thomas Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting ReadWrite recently hosted Keith Rabois, the outspoken startup investor who joined Khosla Ventures from payments company Square earlier this year, at our San Francisco headquarters for ReadWriteMix, an events series featuring free-wheeling discussion with prominent tech figures.We started the conversation with an observation Rabois once made to me—tech companies have created a trillion dollars of value for investors over the past decade, but that value has been incredibly concentrated. The rise in value has come from at most 10-15 companies—the likes of Apple, Google, and Facebook.And while hundreds if not thousands of startups get funded every year, only a dozen or so even stand a chance of joining that pantheon.So the question for Rabois, who has worked at PayPal, LinkedIn, Slide, and Square, and backed startups like Yelp, Airbnb, and Yammer: What’s the trick?It’s The Product—But It’s Not Just The ProductWhen Rabois was at PayPal, he ran strategy and legal affairs—including figuring out how to deal with eBay, Visa, and Mastercard, all of which, he says, were trying to kill the payments startup. His training as an antitrust lawyer helped in figuring out PayPal’s competitive strategy—but PayPal didn’t fight primarily in the courts. It fought by getting eBay’s own users on its side.The advice is generally applicable to startups looking to build a business on a bigger company’s platform, as PayPal did by offering credit-card payments on eBay’s auctions site.An audience member asked if startups should band together to contest a company’s capricious or unfair manipulation of a platform on which they’re building businesses. Rabois said he didn’t think that would work.Instead, you have to fight by perfecting your product.“You have to build a product that real users love—not just use, but love,” said Rabois. “And you’ve got to figure out a way to get it in enough of their hands so they truly can’t live without it. Because then when the platform wants to change things, you have real people that are animated. And if those people are animated, they can go to the media, they can go to their congressmen. That’s what you have to have to protect yourself. Anything you do tactically isn’t going to help you. It’s got to be scaled, and it’s got to be true love…. Focus on that.”The Public RouteRabois is also on the board of two public companies, Yelp and Xoom. Yelp has seen a nice runup in its stock recently, and shares of Xoom, an international money-transfer service, are up from their IPO price even after a 59% first-day pop.That goes against conventional wisdom in Silicon Valley these days—that companies should delay going public as long as possible, and avoid the public markets if possible. (Evernote CEO Phil Libin, for example, has talked about his reluctance to take his company public.)Rabois said there were “two schools of thought”—entrepreneurs who are “deferring” IPOs, and entrepreneurs “who welcome it.”“If you’re building an enduring company, one that will last, say, 50 years, it is almost certain that the way you’re going to do that is by becoming a publicly traded company,” Rabois told me. “If your ambition in life is to transform the world through your product technology, and to continue to do that every generation, year after year, year after year, through different management, through different CEOs, a public company is a very good format to do that.”Rabois also noted that going public gives companies a currency for acquisitions.“It also means something to the public,” he said. “It’s actually a safer place to do business. And I think consumers react that way. I think LinkedIn going public was incredibly successful as a marketing campaign for the company. More people became aware of it and filled out profiles.”Rabois said we should expect to see more IPOs in September and October of this year.That’s just some of the ground we covered in our 45-minute chat. Here’s a highlights clip and a complete video of our talk. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Quebecers stranded by Haitian protests expected to fly back to Canada today

first_imgMONTREAL — More than 100 Quebec tourists who have been trapped in Haiti due to violent street protests are expected to return to Canada today.Helicopter evacuations began this morning to transport travellers from a resort hotel on the Caribbean country’s Cote des Arcadins to the airport in the capital of Port-au-Prince.Air Transat, which sold the tourists the vacation package, is providing the flight back to Montreal’s Pierre Elliott Trudeau airport that is expected to land this evening.The airline had previously resisted calls to transport the vacationers to the airport, citing issues with both logistics and security.Other Canadians stuck in Haiti have also been making their way to the airport by way of helicopter flights or harrowing road journeys.Protests demanding the resignation of President Jovenel Moise have claimed several lives over the past week.Protesters are angry about skyrocketing inflation and the government’s failure to prosecute embezzlement from a multi-billion Venezuelan program that sent discounted oil to Haiti.The Canadian Presslast_img read more