Tag: 南京桑拿信息

SMC bloc, allies vow to lend players for Gilas amid PBA impasse

first_imgSteam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ READ: Narvasa remains defiant: I’m fighting for principleNational team head coach Chot Reyes can heave a sigh of relief as he begins the Smart Gilas Pilipinas’ preparations on Friday evening.Players like June Mar Fajardo, Christian Standhardinger, and Von Pessumal of San Miguel, Japeth Aguilar and Kevin Ferrer of Ginebra, Paul Lee and Jio Jalalon of Star, Terrence Romeo of GlobalPort, and LA Revilla and Russel Escoto of Kia have the greenlight to join the national team’s preparations for the Asian qualifiers.The Philippines is set to open its first round assignment against Japan in Tokyo on November 24, before playing Chinese Taipei at Smart Araneta Coliseum on November 27.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set Stephen Curry puzzled over mention in GOP tax proposal Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson MOST READ Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netThe PBA governors may be at an impasse when it comes to the matters about the Commissioner’s office, but the teams remain united when it comes to the national team.The five teams supporting the extension of PBA commissioner Chito Narvasa said that they won’t allow the controversy to affect the league’s commitment to Smart Gilas Pilipinas.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny In a joint statement released on Friday, San Miguel, Ginebra, Star, GlobalPort, and Kia said they are still allowing their players to suit for national team duties for the 2017 Fiba World Cup qualifiers as part of the PBA’s agreement with Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas (SBP).READ: Seven PBA governors stand firm, urge Narvasa to resign FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smog“All five teams composed of San Miguel Beer, Barangay Ginebra, Star Hotshots, GlobalPort and Kia Picanto will continue to make available its players to the Philippine team that is preparing for the Fiba Asia World Cup qualifier and other league functions. We believe this should not be adversely affected by the board members’ differences in opinion,” the statement read.“We reiterate that we are doing this to protect the league we all love, the game of basketball and the millions of fans who continue to support us.”last_img read more

Unreliability in Science Reaches Epic Proportions

first_imgDr Jerry Bergman is a contributing author and scientist for Creation-Evolution Headlines. Read his Author Profile for his previous articles. (Visited 531 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 by Dr Jerry BergmanAudio Playerhttps://crev.info/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Bergman-20170603-ReproducibilityCrisis.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Concerns about unreliable findings in biomedical research, such as cancer research, have been well documented. The problem is known as the ‘reproducibility crisis.’ If this is a problem in a field open to observation and visible in the here and now—biomedical research—what about evolution, which is based on events and extinct life forms that are claimed to have existed eons ago?University of Bristol Professor Marcus Munafò writes in Nature in a book review about the crisis,As scientists, we are supposed to be objective and disinterested, careful sifters of evidence. The reality is messier. Our training can give us only so much protection from natural tendencies to see patterns in randomness, respond unconsciously to incentives, and argue forcefully in defence of our own positions, even in the face of mounting contrary evidence. In the competitive crucible of modern science, various perverse incentives conspire to undermine the scientific method, leading to a literature littered with unreliable findings. [1]It’s an alarming statement. The problem is even more serious, though, with evolutionary studies. These are usually based on fragmentary pieces of evidence, like fossils or genes, that evolutionists sometimes manipulate to defend their particular ideas, or at least to try to provide some semblance of plausibility for their pet theories. As Mark Twain aptly stated a century ago, reconstruction of past life is often based on “nine bones and six hundred barrels of plaster.”A wide-ranging critique of modern biomedical research by science journalist Richard Harris documents the fact that, over the past decade the replication of many published research findings has shown their results to be false, or at least questionable. [2]  And since most findings in biomedical science have not been replicated, the actual failures may be far worse than Harris documents. In his book, Rigor Mortis: How Sloppy Science Creates Worthless Cures, Crushes Hope, and Wastes Billions, Harris calls for a new discipline to address the problem: he calls it ‘meta-science,’ the scientific study of science itself (4/04/17).Among the shocking examples Harris cites, there was a 2012 study by Glenn Begley that found only 11% (6 out of 53) of ‘landmark’ cancer research studies could be confirmed by the biotechnology firm Amgen. [3] Since then, “numerous studies (most recently in psychology and cancer biology) have confirmed that failure to replicate published findings is the norm.” Munafò  continues, saying that “Harris identifies potential culprits, from the complexity of modern biomedical science to the limitations of tools and training, and perverse incentives in modern academia.” [4] The worst failure rate came from a study that “replicated 100 psychology studies, and fewer than half got the same results” as the original published papers. [5]The reasons for irreproducibility are many, but whatever the causes, these alarming statistics show that many original or even replicated studies are unreliable. This study was originally published in one of the most prestigious science magazines, Science. [6] And much research on evolution theories cannot even be replicated in the same way that biomedical research can. At best, the evidence used to arrive at evolutionary conclusions can be reexamined – that is, if permission is granted by the person or organization that owns the artifacts, often bones.Replication is an important scientific tool for exposing fraudulent research. Many consider it a hallmark of science. In actual practice, though, replication often is not carried out for many reasons. Most researchers lack the time, money, and motivation to replicate the work of others because replication is not original science. It is mostly arduous work with few potential rewards. The scientific establishment and the media reward originality. Being second usually wins few accolades. For these and other reasons, replications of most studies are infrequently attempted unless they are particularly controversial.Another reason replication is not often attempted is because it requires the original experimenters to delineate the exact protocol they used for their experiments. But in evolutionary studies, analysis of fossils or other data cited in papers, often are not, or cannot, be perfectly described in detail. The descriptions published by researchers may be detailed, but are often incomplete.Munafò lists a few of the many problems with both biomedical and evolutionary studies:Failure is a normal part of science, but dressing it up as success (for example, by presenting a secondary outcome as the primary outcome) is misleading. So is packaging exploratory, hypothesis-generating work as confirmatory, hypothesis-testing work. Unfortunately, with few ways to publish negative results, such practices are encouraged by incentives to present clean results with a compelling narrative, and be the first to do so.The lesson is clear. We must read all science studies with a skeptical eye – especially studies purported to show evidence for Darwinism.[1] Marcus Munafò, “Reproducibility blues.” Nature, 543:619. March 30, 2017.[2] Richard Harris, Rigor Mortis: How Sloppy Science Creates Worthless Cures, Crushes Hope, and Wastes Billions. New York: Basic Books, 2017.[3] C. Glen Begley and Lee M. Ellis, “Drug development: Raise standards for preclinical cancer research.” Nature. 483:531–533, 2012.[4] Munafò, Ibid.[5]  Brian Handwerk, “Scientists Replicated 100 Psychology Studies, and Fewer Than Half Got the Same Results.” Smithsonian.com, August 27, 2015.[6] “Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science.” Science, 349(6251):943. August 28, 2015.[7] Munafò, Ibid.last_img read more

Primary schools get a helping hand

first_imgRay Maota Mamokete Mokoena Mncube, principalof Duzenendlela Primary School; Joshua Pule, Nedbank’s portfolio manager for CSR; Mlamleli Belot of the City of Joburg; and Antoinette Nicolaai, district director of Johannesburg South at the Department of Education, handing over essential school items to a pupil. Pule said that Nedbank strives tocontribute towards a strong, flourishing, knowledge based economy in South Africa, hence its involvement in education and the community. Schoolchildren performed a gumboot dance at the handover ceremony. (Images: Ray Maota) MEDIA CONTACTS • Lesiba Sethoga  Nedbank: Communications  +27 11 294 2997 RELATED ARTICLES • Needy pupils kitted out for school • Career guidance initiative launched • Nedbank invests in water project • Nedbank branch runs on wind powerThe challenges in education and of poverty in South Africa are being tackled by Nedbank through its Back-to-School campaign, which is making sure pupils have all the resources needed to succeed at school.On 8 March 2012, Nedbank, the Department of Education and representatives from the City of Joburg met pupils and teachers at Duzenendlela Primary School, in Sweet Waters, in the south of Johannesburg. They were there to hand over essential school items such as uniforms, shoes, stationery, books, bags and sports kits to the underprivileged pupils.In return, the pupils sang, recited poems and danced for their visitors. The school choir sang the national anthem, a pupil recited Gift Mzingwa’s poem, The Black Badge, and some boys performed a gumboot dance.Duzenendlela, a no-fee-paying school, was one of four schools that received these essentials. The others were Inkululeko Yesizwe Primary, Itemoheng Primary and Govan Mbeki Primary. All are situated in and around Sweet Waters, a poor settlement on the southern outskirts of Johannesburg.More than 200 pupils are benefitting from the campaign.Kone Gugushe, Nedbank’s divisional executive for corporate social responsibility, said: “Education is one of our key corporate social responsibility focus areas and we are delighted to partner with government to ensure that all learners are able to focus on their studies rather than on school resources.“The Back-to-School campaign seeks to ensure that even those learners from disadvantaged backgrounds have an equal chance at being the best student they can be.”This year’s campaign was launched in January in Limpopo and has been rolled out in KwaZulu-Natal, Free State, Western Cape, Eastern Cape, North West and Mpumalanga provinces. Nedbank is investing R2-million (US$251 000) in its 2012 campaign. Some 1 800 pupils across the country will benefit from the initiative.Antoinette Nicolaai, the Department of Education’s district director in Johannesburg South, said: “Just as President Jacob Zuma outlined in the State of the Nation Address [on February 9], education is vital for people to take their rightful place in society.”The school close to the roadDuzenendlela means “close to the road”, which is literally where the school is situated. The school is on the Golden Highway, the busy main road leading to Sweet Waters.It offers underprivileged children from the nearby informal settlements of Sweet Waters unpaid schooling with a nutrition programme and transport scheme to fetch and drop them off before and after school.Mamokete Mokoena Mncube, the principal, said: “The school appreciates what Nedbank has done for us. Our pupils are from poverty-stricken areas where the unemployment rate is high and these resources provided by Nedbank will go a long way in offering them a quality educational experience.”The vegetable tunnel donated by Nedbank would also help with the nutrition programme as vegetables would be used for the soup kitchen. They would also be sold, so helping the school with fund raising.Nedbank’s contribution in GautengThe bank, one of South Africa’s big four, has invested nearly R22-million ($3-million) in Gauteng over the past five years in education, health, community and socio-economic development programmes.It approaches education in a holistic manner, taking into consideration strong leadership, quality teaching, resourced learners, adequate infrastructure, community involvement and proper academic support. Nedbank has supported various educational programmes in Gauteng.These include: financial support to the tune of R7-million ($928 000) for orphaned and vulnerable children studying at Dominican Convent; funding extra tutorials in maths, science and English for R1.4-million ($186 000) through the Tomorrow Trust and Leap Maths and Science Schools; R700 000 ($93 000) for leadership development of high school pupils through Heartlines; teaching 9 000 pupils at 65 schools in grades 6 and 7 to play chess; as well supplying mobile laboratories and classrooms.Joshua Pule, Nedbank’s portfolio manager for corporate social responsibility, said: “We at Nedbank are passionate about contributing towards education and building closer relationships with our communities.“This we do to ensure that we enable access and opportunities for learners and improve educational facilities throughout South Africa to build a strong, flourishing, knowledge-based economy.”last_img read more

What We Can Learn from Editing with the Coen Brothers

first_imgEditor Eyal Dimant shares some insights based on his work editing with the Coen Brothers on “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs.”While we all know and love the Coen Brothers for their filmmaking masterpieces spanning from Raising Arizona to The Big Lebowski to their latest Netflix anthology series The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, we usually associate the brothers as savant writer and directors.However, editing has long been a part of the duo’s filmmaking expertise (and was actually how Joel got his break into the industry, working as an assistant editor on Sam Raimi’s The Evil Dead in 1981). True auteurs, the Coen Brothers more often than not write, direct, produce and edit their own features, including: Blood Simple, Barton Fink, Fargo and No Country for Old Men.Despite their film editing upbringings, the brothers have finally made the transition to digital on their latest Netflix anthology feature The Ballad of Buster Scruggs. They’ve also begun to divvy up their filmmaking control on projects like Buster Scruggs and have enlisted the help of other collaborators and editors to help out.One lucky editor was Eyal Dimant. In an interview with Adobe, he had some pretty interesting insights to share from his experience working with the Coen Brothers on their latest film.Sitting in with the Coen BrothersImage via Fargo (Gramercy Pictures).Image from Fargo (via.I was very fortunate. Usually, you’re an editor and you’re working with directors, or you’re an assistant to other editors. Here, I got to sit next to the directors, who were also the editors, for nearly a year. I learned a lot about how they edit, which is very different from most other workflows.Eyal was brought onto The Ballad of Buster Scruggs as an associate editor to help streamline their digital editing process. If you really want to learn a skill set, the best way is to go out do it yourself. The second best way is to work side-by-side with those who have done it time and time again. Look for those with enough valuable wisdom to share.How Filmmakers EditImage via Raising Arizona (20th Century Fox).Joel and Ethan are usually writing and directing, so they’re not in Premiere Pro every day. We wanted to make sure they had a seamless editing experience that allowed for maximum collaboration.There’s a big difference between being asked to sit down and edit a project for someone else, and being a filmmaker yourself and trying to sit down to edit your own film. For the Coen Brothers, as Eyal explains, the editing process was never a traditional singular focus gig. After all, they always had other things going on. It was Eyal’s role to streamline that process to make it accessible for the brothers to bounce in and out of.A Collaborative Editing ProcessImage via Barton Fink (via 20th Century Fox).It’s interesting to peek into how the two brothers were able to edit together collaboratively. Eyal shares that they had a workflow where “Ethan would pull his selections from the dailies and move them into a bin. When he was done, he’d ring a bell. That was the cue for Eyal and his fellow editors to refresh Joel’s system, where Joel would pull all the selections and insert them into the timeline.”This two-person daily review system would help weed out unwanted shots. It also focused both of them on their best footage and what they’d be looking for moving forward.Trying New Styles and EffectsImage via The Big Lebowski (Gramercy Pictures).The most fun part of the job was being a sounding board, giving them suggestions and ideas as they worked. I would usually jump in to do split screens, or any other optical effects that Joel wanted to be able to see immediately in the cut.The Coen Brothers have never been traditional filmmaking purists in a lot of senses. They’ve often found fun and creative ways to utilize split-screens and other simple visual tricks (most notably in The Big Lebowski) in their films. So, part of Eyal’s job was to be their editing associate resource to jump in and help on these optical effects. That way the brothers could check out and review them.Never Stop Challenging Yourself and LearningImage via No Country for Old Men (Paramount Vantage).My ideal project is one where I’m surrounded by people who are smarter than I am. I like to learn new things and be challenged on a daily basis, which is exactly what happened with this film.If Eyal and the Coen Brothers can teach the rest of us anything about editing, it’s that the most important aspect in a filmmaker is the desire to keep learning. Even with Eyal’s 20 years of industry experience, and the Coen Brothers decades of filmmaking success, both are always looking for new challenges and ways to grow their craft. And so should you.Cover image via The Ballad of Buster Scruggs.For more filmmaking and editing advice and interviews, check out some of these links.Documentary Editing Tips and Avoiding Unconscious BiasVideo Editing 101: Prepping for a Quick (and Successful) Edit5 Reasons Why You Should Shoot Your Own Digital Web SeriesProfessional Video Editing Tips and TechniquesJonah Hill on Writing and Directing Mid90s — and Tips He Learned from the Greatslast_img read more

I’ve got a family pack, no six-pack: Armaan Jain

first_imgArmaan Jain, Bollywood’s new kid on the block, says he doesn’t have the perfect six-pack abs but he follows a regular workout regimen.Most newcomers in tinsel town come with a perfect physique complete with the six-pack.Does Armaan aim for it too?”I’ve got a family pack! There is no six-pack. If (in a film) my character demands, I will work on my body. But I am into sports. I work out daily for two hours besides playing football, cricket and tennis,” Armaan said here.Most newcomers in tinsel town come with a perfect physique complete with the six-pack.He is making his debut with Arif Ali-directed “Lekar Hum Deewana Dil”, which also features Deeksha Seth.Before facing the camera, Armaan has had a taste of filmmaking when he assisted filmmaker Karan Johar.”I assisted Karan Johar for three years – during ‘My Name is Khan’, ‘Ek Main Aur Ekk Tu’ and ‘Student Of The Year’. I got very influenced by his direction. I am fascinated with the art of filmmaking. I didn’t go to Karan with the idea that he would launch me…but I went to learn direction,” he said.Armaan also misses working as an assistant.”I wish I could go back on the set. I was purely into acting (initially), but when I started learning direction, I got interested in it. I made short films as well, and now I have developed a new passion for direction,” added the youngster, who happens to be the cousin of actor Ranbir Kapoor.advertisementlast_img read more