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Bernard Boutin, 88, former president of Saint Michael’s College and Burlington Savings Bank

first_imgThe obituary notice follows: Bernard L. BoutinMeredith. NH—–Bernard L. Boutin, 88, of 77 Barnard Ridge Road, Meredith died at the Lakes Region General Hospital, Laconia, NH on Wednesday, August 24, 2011. Mr. Boutin was born July 2, 1923 in Belmont, N.H., the son of Joseph L. and Annie E. (LaFlam) Boutin.  He was a longtime resident of  the Lakes Region  and had attended the Belmont  public schools and was Senior Class Valedictorian.  He attended The Catholic University of America in Washington, D. C. from 1942-1943 and  graduated  Ph. B (Cum Laude) and Valedictorian from St. Michael’s College, Colchester, Vermont in 1945.  In 1963, he received an honorary degree, LLD,  from St. Michael’s College.  He received an Honorary Doctor of Humanities from Franklin Pierce College, Rindge, N.H. in 1969 and an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Plymouth State College of the University of New Hampshire in 1970.  Mr. Boutin was a partner of the Boutin Real Estate Company from 1945-1963, President and Treasurer of the Boutin Insurance Agency, Inc. from 1945-1963 and Partner of the Busy Corner Store from 1956-1959.Mr. Boutin served two terms as Mayor, City of Laconia, from 1955-1959.  He was the Democratic Nominee for Governor of New Hampshire in 1958 and 1960 and was in charge of the John F. Kennedy Campaign for President in the 1960 NH Primary.  From 1956-1960 he was a member of the Democratic National Committee.  Mr. Boutin was appointed by President Kennedy as Deputy Administrator, General Services Administration, Jan. 1961 to November 1961 and then was appointed by President Kennedy as Administrator, General Services Administration, Washington, D.C., Nov. 1961 to December 1964. In 1964, he was co-coordinator of Johnson for President for New England States and New York.  From 1964-1965, Mr. Boutin was Executive Vice President of the National Association of Home Builders, Washington, D.C.  In 1964, he was co-chair, with Gregory Peck,  of one of the Presidential Inaugural Balls, Washington, D.C.  In 1965 & 1966, President Johnson appointed Mr. Boutin as Deputy Director, The Office of Economic Opportunity, Washington, D.C. and then appointed Mr. Boutin as Administrator, Small Business Administration, Washington, D.C. from 1966-1967.From 1967-1969, Mr. Boutin was Director, Corporate Information Services and member of the President’s staff of Sanders Associates, Inc., Nashua, N.H. and was consultant to the company from 1969-1976.  He was a member of the Board of Directors of the Indian Head National Bank, Nashua, N.H. from 1967-1969, a member-at-large of the, National Advisory Council, Small Business Administration in 1968 & 1969 as well as a member of the Resources Panel (consultant) of the American Bankers Association. He was also a member of the N.H. Coordinating Board of  Advanced Education and Accreditation and Chairman of the New Hampshire State Board of Education in 1968 and 1969. Mr. Boutin was a Representative to the Board of Governors, Catholic University of America  from 1968-1973.  From 1970-1975,he was a member of the Board of Directors of the Vermont  Federal Savings & Loan and from 1972-1974 he was a member of the Vermont Commission on Higher Education Facilities.   Mr. Boutin was on the Board of Directors, National Council of Independent Colleges and Universities from 1970-1974.From 1970-1972, Mr. Boutin was on the Board of Directors of HI-G Inc., Windsor Locks, Connecticut and was on the Board of Directors of the Greater Burlington Industrial Corp. from 1969-1974.  He was a member of the National Highway Safety Advisory Committee, U. S. Dept. of Transportation in 1969 & 1970, appointed by  President  Johnson.Mr. Boutin was President of St. Michael’s College, Colchester, Vermont from March 1969 to November 1974.   He was Executive Vice President of the Burlington Savings Bank from May 1975 to August 1976, President of the Burlington Savings Bank, Burlington, Vermont, from August 1976 to October 1980 and on the Board of Directors, First Deposit National Bank of San Francisco from September 1991 to January 1994.Mr. Boutin served on several committees including The First Lady’s Committee for a More Beautiful Capital, The President’s Committee for Equal Employment Opportunity, the Cabinet Committee on the National Stockpile, The President’s Committee on Employment of the Handicapped, The President’s ad hoc Committee on Disposal of Surplus Federal Land, the President’s ad hoc Committee on the Architecture for Federal Buildings and Government Office Space, the President’s Advisory Council on the Arts, the President’s Committee on Rural Poverty and the Vermont Private Schools Study Committee.Mr. Boutin had been a Minister of the Eucharist since 1983 and in 1992, he was named by Pope John-Paul  a Knight of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulcher of Jerusalem.Mr. Boutin was a former member, Board of Directors, of the Hillsborough County Community Action Committee, a former director of the American Standards Association, NYC, Past President of the New Hampshire Municipal Association, former chairman of the Laconia Airport Authority, former National Director and State President of St. Michael’s College Alumni Association, former Vice president of the Laconia Chamber of Commerce, former director of both the Laconia and Burlington Rotary Clubs, a former trustee of Laconia Hospital, past Exalted Ruler of the Laconia Lodge of Elks #876, former member of the Government Advisory Council and American Management Association, a former member of the American Society for Public Administration, a former trustee of St. Michael’s College, a former member of the International Platform Association, former director of the Nashua Chamber of Commerce, consultant, National Council of Catholic Men, 1967-1975, former member of the Fanny Allen Hospital Associates, Board of Governors, The Medical Center Hospital of Vermont from 1973-1980, Trustee, Medical Center Hospital of Vermont 1975-1980, Treasurer, 1977-1980, Chairman and Director of the Retired Senior Volunteer Program Advisory Council, 1975-1978, member of the Board of Rice Memorial High School from 1976-1978, member of the Ethan Allen Club, Burlington, Vermont   from 1975-1980, trustee of the Vermont Foundation of Independent Colleges, Inc., 1976-80 and a former member of the Finance Committee, Trinity College, Burlington, Vermont.Mr. Boutin was the recipient of many awards including the Award of Excellence for Outstanding and Meritorious Service to the Home Building Industry of America by the Crestline Manufacturing Company in 1966, Top Performer Award in the Field of Housing, House and Home Magazine, in 1966, Outstanding Service as Administrator of General Services Administration, Contracting Plaster and Lather International Association in 1965, Certificate of Appreciation, Mississippi Conference NAACP in 1965, Distinguished Service Medal, General Services Administration, 1964, Commendation, the President’s Committee on Employment of the Physically Handicapped in 1964, Alumni Association Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Field of Government, The Catholic University of America in 1963, the Award for Outstanding Achievement, St. Michael’s College Alumni Association, 1959, the Certificate of Commendation, the National Guard, 1957, the Policyholders Good Citizenship Award, the Mutual Trust Life Ins .Co. in 1969 and the Eastern USA Outstanding Service Award, the National Council of Independent Colleges and Universities  1974, the Delta Epsilon Sigma and National Honor Society.  In 2002, Mr. Boutin was inaugurated into the first class of the Saint Michael’s College Academic  Hall of Fame. Survivors include his wife of 67 years, Alice M. (Boucher) Boutin, of  Meredith; six sons, Edmund J. and LindaAnne Boutin of Chester, N.H., Joseph L. and Dale  Boutin of Burlington, Vermont, Louis B. and Carole Boutin of Bedford, N.H., John P. Winooski, Vermont, Paul R. Judy Boutin of Colchester, Vermont and Bernard L. and Gay Boutin II of Fremont, N.H.; five daughters, Bernadette  A. and Bruce Fischer of Colchester, Vermont, Michelle A. and Dennis Lamper of Meredith, N.H., Marie J. Boutin of South Burlington, Vermont, Elizabeth J. and John McGrath of Manchester, Vermont and Suzanne T.  Boutin of Rochester, N.H.; twenty-three grandchildren; three step-grandchildren; thirteen great grandchildren; five step-great-grandchildren; and four nephews and two nieces.  In addition to his parents, Mr. Boutin was predeceased by two sisters, June Fitzpatrick and Lorraine Morin.  Calling hours will be held at the Wilkinson-Beane-Simoneau-Paquette Funeral Home & Cremation Services on 164 Pleasant St., Laconia, N.H. on Monday, August 29 from 4-7pm. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 11am on Tuesday August 30 at St. Charles Borromeo Catholic Church, 300 NH Route 25, Meredith, NH by the Very Reverend  Dennis J.  Audet, V.F., Pastor of the Church. Burial will be at the family lot in Sacred Heart Cemetery, Garfield St., Laconia, N.H. at 3pm. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests that memorial donations be made to the Boutin Family Scholarship Fund at Saint Michael College or to the Building Fund at St. Charles Borromeo Church. Wilkinson-Beane-Simoneau-Paquette Funeral Home & Cremation Services, 164 Pleasant Street, Laconia, N.H. is assisting the family with the arrangements.  For more information and to view an online memorial go to www.wilkinsonbeane.com(link is external). Bernard Boutin passed away in Laconia, New Hampshire, on the evening of August 24, 2011.  He was born in Laconia on July 2, and died peacefully after a short illness during which his family was constantly with him.            Mr. Boutin was a well known New Hampshire native and was prominent in national affairs throughout the 1960’s.  He was a valedictorian graduate of Saint Michael’s College, Class of 1945 and Mayor of Laconia from 1955 to 1959. In 1958 and 1960 Mr. Boutin was New Hampshire’s Democratic nominee for Governor. In 1959 and 1960, he was heavily involved in the primary and general election campaign of President John F. Kennedy, with whom he had a close relationship.             Shortly after President Kennedy’s election, Mr. Boutin was named Deputy Administrator of the General Services Administration, one of the largest federal agencies, and became its administrator from 1961 until 1964.  After leaving the government for a short period, President Johnson appointed Mr. Boutin to be Deputy Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, a newly created federal agency, and then as Administrator of the Small Business Administration.  One of Mr. Boutin’s proudest accomplishments was the redesign and reconstruction of Lafayette Square across from the White House, a project that he worked personally with the President and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy.  Among other positions, Mr. Boutin also served on the President’s Advisory Council on the Arts and the First Lady’s Committee for a More Beautiful Capitol.            Mr. Boutin’s career also included the Presidency of Saint Michael’s College from 1969 to 1974, a period where he is credited with stabilizing the college financially, bringing it to co-education and building its endowment.  Boutin retired in 1980 after serving as CEO of Vermont’s largest bank.  He was active after his retirement as an outside Director of several publicly held corporations.             Outside of his professional career, Mr. Boutin devoted his life to service.  He served on boards of medical facilities, educational institutions, business development organizations, and Catholic charities and committees.  Mr. Boutin was also an advocate for the handicapped and for the preservation of historic sites and the reclamation of surplus federal lands.            Boutin is survived by his 11 children and by his loving wife Alice (Boucher) to whom he was married for 67 years.  last_img read more

FRC finds support for stewardship code to mirror section 172 duty

first_imgThe UK’s accounting and audit regulator has highlighted support for new stewardship requirements for investors similar to those currently imposed on company directors.Respondents to a recent Financial Reporting Council (FRC) consultation supported modifying the UK stewardship code to include a duty for investors similar to section 172 of the UK Companies Act.The accounting watchdog is due to present a revised stewardship code for public consultation later this year, but asked for views on some initial questions when it consulted on amendments to the corporate governance code in December.The FRC floated the idea of a “section 172 for asset managers”. Under this part of the UK’s Companies Act 2006, directors have a duty to promote the success of a company for the benefit of shareholders, but in doing so they must have regard to a number of other factors and stakeholders, including employees. Reporting on feedback to both consultations yesterday, the FRC said the majority of respondents were in favour of the stewardship code mirroring at least some elements of the code for listed companies.“Many respondents were in favour of including a similar duty for investors as exists under section 172 of the Companies Act for directors,” the FRC reported.The revised corporate governance code, which was unveiled yesterday, asks boards to describe how they have considered the interests of stakeholders when performing this duty – or to explain why they haven’t done so.The FRC said there was support for stewardship code signatories to report on how they had considered a wide range of stakeholders in their own organisations, their investment process, and the companies in which they invest.There was support for strengthening the definition of the purpose of stewardship and for including issues such as culture and diversity and workforce matters within the code.However, many respondents were wary about the code including a prescribed list of environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) issues to be monitored and acted on.The FRC said: “There was a broad preference for the stewardship code to encourage a focus on material long-term issues, or to require a description of how investments and stewardship approaches align with clients’ long-term interests, as a useful way of encouraging signatories to consider ESG issues, without being too prescriptive.”Stewardship by bondholdersA majority of respondents also felt it would be helpful to have clearer expectations of the stewardship roles and responsibilities of those “at different points in the investment chain”, the FRC reported.Many respondents called for specific attention to be paid to the role of proxy advisers.The current stewardship code, which was last reviewed in 2012, is primarily concerned with the role of investors as shareholders in publicly listed companies. According to the FRC, however, there was broad agreement among respondents that “including an increased range of asset classes… would be helpful, with fixed income assets being the most frequently cited as appropriate for inclusion”.There were 109 responses to the December 2017 consultation questions on the stewardship code. A breakdown by type of respondent was not provided.The UK stewardship code is aimed at fund managers, pension fund trustees and other asset owners and can also be used by service providers.The FRC recently appointed a 17-strong committee of investors to help inform its future work on issues such as corporate governance and stewardship.last_img read more

Building offers new spaces, opportunities

first_imgThis article is part of the Daily Trojan‘s supplement issue, “If you build it, will they come?” This semester’s supplement focused on the impact of the new Ronald Tutor Campus Center and University Gateway apartment complex, both of which will open this fall.In his eight semesters at USC, Fabian Salas, a senior majoring in accounting, spent a lot of time exploring Los Angeles. He spent little time, however, exploring his own campus.“There have been semesters where I was working weekends at Leavey [Library], but most of the time I would just not be around campus if I didn’t have to be because the campus is always pretty dead,” Salas said. “When I didn’t have to work, I knew I would have a better time going out to other places in L.A.”The Forum (above) and Traditions are two features of the new campus center. – Carlo Acenas | Daily Trojan Salas is not the only one who feels this way. For years, students looking for weekend entertainment have had to look elsewhere — campus has been a virtual ghost town on weekends. But with the opening of the Ronald Tutor Campus Center, that could be about to change.Administrators hope the addition of the campus center this fall will finally create a central, on-campus destination that students have been missing since the closing of the Norman Topping Student Center and Commons in 2008. When it opens, the campus center will include meeting rooms, performance venues and food options, and will hopefully host a number of student organizations’ events.“I really believe this building will transform the word ‘community’ at USC,” said Jason Cruz, project coordinator for the campus center. “[It] will become the hub of activity, and I think people will start saying, ‘Meet me at the campus center.’”For the past two years, student organizations have relied solely on Bovard Auditorium, Ground Zero Café and classroom lecture halls to host events and performances, and some have found it difficult to find an appropriate venue.Alexa Ekman, president of the USC College Republicans, said finding a venue for events has been very challenging. Ekman tried to book a room three months in advance for the group’s biggest event of the year, Teach-in to Oppose Obama’s Radical Transformation of America, but had to settle for a room in Taper Hall instead.Ekman said it is disappointing to bring important guest speakers to campus only to have them greeted with a classroom lecture hall, rather than a more welcoming venue.“It’s fine to have regular meetings in classrooms or smaller settings, but when you have a nice speaker, guests who donate to your club and people who travel to see your event, you want to host it in a really nice environment,” she said.According to Heather Larabee, assistant dean of students and director of Campus Activities, the campus center will make it much easier for organizations that have had trouble finding venues to host events on campus.Aja Heisler, director of external communications for the USC College Democrats, said the group is excited because the campus center will offer neutral venues.“Usually we can find a venue, but last weekend we held something at the USC Hillel Center. That could have possibly been misleading to people because our events are in no way associated with religion, they were just nice enough to let us borrow the area,” Heisler said.Cristina Pandol, executive director of Women and Youth Supporting Each Other, has also run into issues because of the lack of space on campus.“We had to hold our self-defense event in Exposition Park, and, being outdoors, we were nervous it would rain,” Pandol said. “With about 150 people, it’s not like we could have just used a classroom.”Students will be able to reserve meeting rooms, The Forum and Tommy’s Place for free, while the Ballroom will cost money, said Heidi Ippolito, scheduling production manager for the SCheduling Office. Student organizations will also be allowed to utilize the Ballroom for one event for free, except staffing charges.The campus center will also offer more than 30 meeting rooms for students and will have lounges on every floor.Visions and Voices currently holds a number of events in Bovard Auditorium, but the addition of the campus center will be beneficial since events can now be held in the Ballroom or The Forum, according to Mary Megowan, program assistant for Visions and Voices.The Ballroom can accommodate nearly 1,200 people, and can be divided into four sections depending on the number of guests attending the event, according to Bailey.For some organizations, like USC Spectrum, The Forum offers a much more intimate space.“We like doing events in Doheny [Memorial Library] because you feel like you really get to be in the same space as the guest speaker, and The Forum will be very similar to that,” said Dane Martens, interim director of USC Spectrum.Student organizations, such as Program Board, are excited to utilize Tommy’s Place because they believe the venue will help attract more students.Tommy’s Place offers its own distinct feel with a stage for performances, two pool tables and televisions that can be used by students and faculty for away  games.Adjacent to Tommy’s Place will be the new and improved Traditions, which will be available for all students to eat breakfast, lunch and dinner. For those over 21, Traddies will still serve alcohol.“Our goal is for this area to be one big space. You can watch a live performance at Tommy’s and grab a drink at the bar if you’re over 21,” Cruz said. “The Greek Row is a popular place and we want this to be another option.”KSCR radio station will also broadcast from new facilities adjacent to Tommy’s Place.According to Karl Nickenig, KSCR’s incoming general manager, the station hopes to host a live show every Friday from its new location in the campus center.“I hope it brings more awareness of the local band scene to the overall student body,” Nickenig said.In addition to live performances, the campus center will host a wide variety of food options, including California Pizza Kitchen, Carl’s Junior, Wahoo’s Fish Taco, a marketplace, Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf and Moreton Fig, according to Kris Klinger, director of USC Hospitality.Klinger said dining options will be available on the weekends, but the hours of operation will depend on student usage.Many at USC hope the campus center will provide a common gathering place for students.“You should feel comfortable here, and that’s the goal of this place — to have all of the communities of the university come together in one location,” Bailey said. “Like a community center, the campus center will bring all the facets of USC together.”last_img read more