Tag: 杭州楼凤

PROTESTORS TAKE TO BEACH WHERE COUNCIL PLANS SEWAGE PIPE

first_imgVisitors plus residents of Moville and Greencastle came together on Glenburnie beach at Carnagarve on this evening with the sole intent of sending a strong united message to Irish Water and the Environmental Protection Agency.This is where a proposed sewage discharge pipe will enter the sea….with those behind admitting it will cover the coast with sewage at times of heavy rain.“It has no place in this idyllic setting,” said local campaigner Enda Craig. “Visitors and locals alike are dumbfounded at the lack of reasoning, logic and plain common sense regarding this proposal.“It is now high time that all local residents lobbied their political representatives and insisted this amazing series of golden pocket beaches are formally designated by Donegal Co Council to enable them to be safeguarded for all times.“These beaches, bathing waters and shore walk are this community’s most important local assets both economically and spiritually and must be guarded and protected at all costs from ill informed and ill advised bureaucratic decisions.“It could easily be described as a potential act of vandalism.” The CFCE would like to thank Deputy Padraig Mac Lochlainn TD, Cllr Jack Murray and Clr Albert Doherty for attending the gathering.Local Cllr Martin Farren was unable to attend and sent his apologies.PROTESTORS TAKE TO BEACH WHERE COUNCIL PLANS SEWAGE PIPE was last modified: July 24th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:CarnagarvedonegalGreencastlemovillesewage protestlast_img read more

CRPF jawan arrested for outraging the modesty of a woman at Goa beach

first_imgThe Calangute police in North coastal Goa on Tuesday arrested a Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) jawan, Rajvir Prabhudayal Singh, for outraging the modesty of a woman.Jivba Dalvi, Police Inspector-in-charge of Calangute police station, said that a complaint was received from a lady from Mumbai who was sea-bathing along with her husband and kids at Calangute beach on Tuesday at around 4 p.m. Mr. Singh, who was also sea-bathing nearby, approached the lady, allegedly touched her inappropriately and abused her with vulgar words, thereby outraging her modesty.Further, when the lady’s husband questioned the accused, Mr. Singh assaulted him with fist blows.The police registered an offence Under Section 354-A, 323 of the Indian Penal Code and during the investigation the accused was arrested.During the investigation, it was revealed that the accused, 43, from Dhimwali in Rajasthan, is posted as a Hawaldar in the CRPF and is currently deployed at Recruit Training Centre in Madhya Pradesh, police said.last_img read more

Diana Edulji not in favour of BCCI asking ICC to ban Pakistan from World Cup

first_imgMembers of the Committee of Administrators (CoA) are once again at loggerheads with Diana Edulji not agreeing with Vinod Rai on the decision to write a letter to the International Cricket Council, asking the world governing body to ban Pakistan from the upcoming 50-over World Cup in England and Wales.According to sources, CoA chairman Vinod Rai has asked the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) CEO Rahul Johri to write a letter to the ICC asking them to ban Pakistan from the showpiece event for continuing to harbour terrorists.But Edulji is not in favour of this decision. The two-member Supreme Court-appointed committee will meet on Friday to discuss the future course of action.The CoA is likely to seek advice from the Sports Ministry, Ministry of External Affair and the Home Ministry on this issue.The BCCI and CoA will then hopefully come to a conclusion and take a collective and responsible decision as to what steps can be taken in regards to playing cricket with Pakistan. No letter has been written or sent to the ICC just yet.Calls in India have been growing louder to boycott the World Cup match against Pakistan on June 16 in the wake of the Pulwama terrorist attack in which the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) lost 40 jawans last week.Pakistan-based terror outfit Jaish-e-Mohammed claimed responsibility for the ghastly attack on the CRPF bus which was blown up by a suicide bomber.Former Indian cricketer and current UP Cabinet Minister Chetan Chauhan, in an exclusive to Aaj Tak, had called for India to put pressure on the ICC to “throw Pakistan out of the 2019 Cricket World Cup” earlier on Wednesday.advertisement”World Cup, Olympics is decided years ahead. We don’t play bilateral series with Pakistan. The best thing to do is to throw Pakistan out of the World Cup. Every country is worried with the growth of terrorism in Pakistan. It’s a problem for everyone. We should exert pressure on ICC to throw Pakistan out of the World Cup,” Chauhan told Aaj Tak.”If Pakistan do not play the World Cup, it won’t make any difference. If India do not play, the ICC will suffer losses. India bring in 65 to 70 per cent of the sponsorship,” Chauhan said.India cricketer Harbhajan Singh said India should not play Pakistan in the World Cup after Pakistan-based terror outfit Jaish-e-Mohammad claimed responsibility for the ghastly attack in Pulwama.”India should not play Pakistan in the World Cup. India are powerful enough to win the World Cup without having to play Pakistan,” Harbhajan Singh told Aaj Tak.Also Read | 400000 ticket applicants for India vs Pakistan, claims World Cup Tournament DirectorAlso Read | No chance of bilateral cricket with Pakistan after Pulwama: Sourav GangulyAlso Read | BCCI removes Pakistan cricket related memorabilia from its headquartersAlso Read | What will be the worth of a World Cup if India haven’t beaten Pakistan? Aakash Chopralast_img read more

a month agoHector Bellerin enjoys full 90 for Arsenal U23 in Liverpool draw

first_imgHector Bellerin enjoys full 90 for Arsenal U23 in Liverpool drawby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal fullback Hector Bellerin completed 90 minutes as they came from two goals down to draw with Liverpool at Meadow Park.The Spaniard came close to an opener when he drove through the visitors’ defence and fired a shot at goal but Ben Winterbottom saved well at his near post. Matt Macey then made a brilliant recovery save to keep out Rhian Brewster’s looping header from close range.Liverpool’s pressure paid off when Curtis Jones tapped in following Luis Longstaff’s low cross.The second then came when Jones met another Longstaff cross to head home. The Gunners were back in it on the stroke of half-time when Nathan Tormey beat the offside trap to slot the ball past Winterbottom.Early in the second half Folarin Balogun levelled the scores when he made no mistake from close range following Bellerin’s low cross. About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

20 days agoChelsea boss Lampard pleased with England U21 call for Hudson-Odoi

first_imgChelsea boss Lampard pleased with England U21 call for Hudson-Odoiby Paul Vegas20 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea boss Frank Lampard is happy with the England U21 call for Callum Hudson-Odoi.The winger made his England debut last season before injury struck. “That is a good shout,” says Lampard. “I spoke to Gareth (Southgate) and all I can do is say what I see from a Chelsea end and it is Gareth’s choice. Callum has probably not played enough games and the international games will do him good. “It is England Under-21s and he should be proud of that anyway.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

Nova Scotia court dismisses Victoria Henneberry appeal

first_imgAPTN National NewsVictoria Henneberry had her second-degree murder conviction appeal dismissed by the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal Thursday.Henneberry argued she panicked when she pleaded guilty to murdering Loretta Saunders two years ago.Saunders, an Inuk woman, was murdered inside her Halifax apartment in February 2014. Her body was later found along a highway in New Brunswick.Henneberry was arrested later in Ontario with her boyfriend, and accomplice, Blake Leggette, who pleaded guilty to first-degree murder.See related stories here: Loretta Saunders More to come …last_img

Kent State professor receives grant to study role of oxytocin in the

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 12 2018Heather Caldwell, Ph.D., a professor in Kent State University’s Department of Biological Sciences, recently received a $450,000 grant to study the role that oxytocin plays in the developing brain.Labeled by some as “the bonding hormone,” oxytocin is well known for helping pregnant mothers with uterine contraction while in labor, milk letdown while breastfeeding and a feeling of euphoria when cuddling with their infants. But, there is still much that researchers do not know about how this hormone works in the brains of children.The grant, which came from the National Institutes of Health’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, will enable a study on the three-year project titled “Sex differences in the developing oxytocin system.” The study will provide insight into how oxytocin affects the development of the female and male brain and contributes to the neural regulation of social behavior. Dr. Caldwell’s lab group will be the first to examine the function of oxytocin signaling during early development. Liz Aulino, a Kent State Ph.D. student in Dr. Caldwell’s lab, will focus on this topic for her dissertation.”This research has relevance to public health because many of the neural chemicals, neural substrates and circuits that underlie social behaviors are evolutionarily conserved,” Dr. Caldwell said. “Using an animal model, we hope to improve our understanding of the contributions of oxytocin to the development of social behaviors in humans.”The researchers aim to determine how the developing oxytocin system differs between female and males and also to identify how it differentially impacts their neurochemistry.The brain hormones do not themselves cause behavior, but they modulate it. The key is how they interact with a receptor, in this case, a protein in the cell’s membrane. The developing mouse brain does not make oxytocin early in development, but it has oxytocin receptors ready to signal.Related StoriesRush University Medical Center offers new FDA-approved treatment for brain aneurysmsMercy Medical Center adds O-arm imaging system to improve spinal surgery resultsWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskEmerging evidence shows that, during early brain development, oxytocin helps to organize neural circuits in the brain and that these organizational effects may help the brain develop the capacity to execute sex-specific and context-appropriate social behaviors later in life.”We think these experiments will reveal a novel role for oxytocin in organizing sex-specific brain circuits that are critical for typical displays of social behaviors,” Dr. Caldwell said. “Across mammalian species, oxytocin is important for social cognition and social functioning, and deficits in social behaviors are characteristic of several neurodevelopmental neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.”This type of National Institutes of Health grant, an R15, is an Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) and specifically supports the research, education and training of future scientists through undergraduate research support for students interested in a career in biomedical/behavioral science. Dr. Caldwell will recruit students to collaborate with her and Ms. Aulino, as well as a technician who she plans to hire for the three-year term.Dr. Caldwell developed an interest in the effect of hormones on behavior after doing fieldwork with sea turtles and working on mouse chemical signals as a student at the University of North Carolina Greensboro, where she earned her undergraduate and master’s degrees in biology. Her interest in how hormones affect behavior led her to pursue a doctorate at Georgia State University, which has a large National Science Foundation-supported Center for Behavioral Neuroscience. She spent four years as a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institutes of Health and joined the Kent State faculty in 2007. Dr. Caldwell has been studying how neurochemistry regulates behavior such as aggression, and her primary research focus has been on the closely linked hormones oxytocin and vasopressin.​​Source: https://www.kent.edu/kent/news/new-study-kent-state-researcher-examine-role-oxytocin-developing-brainlast_img read more

Ebola virus identified in a West African bat

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 24 2019The government of Liberia, in partnership with the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and EcoHealth Alliance, announced the discovery of Ebola virus in a bat in Liberia. This is the first finding of Zaire ebolavirus in a bat in West Africa, adding to other evidence suggesting bats serve as a natural wildlife reservoir for Ebola and other related viruses. Scientists found both genetic material from the virus and ebolavirus antibodies in a Greater Long-fingered bat (Mineopterus inflatus) in Liberia’s northeastern Nimba District. CII has been working to identify and characterize novel viruses at the intersection of humans and animals, on a global scale, for more than three decades. This work is a part of the USAID PREDICT project, which aims to better understand the animal reservoirs, seasonality, and transmission of viruses that can cause epidemic diseases.This is the first identification of Ebola virus in a bat in West Africa. There are six species of Ebola virus and Zaire ebolavirus is the one responsible for causing the West African Ebola epidemic which infected nearly 30,000 people between 2013 and 2016. Researchers at CII are working to determine whether the strain found in the bat is exactly the same one associated with the 2013-2016 outbreak. The evidence so far from about 20 percent of the virus’ genome suggests that it is closely related. Zaire ebolavirus is also responsible for the ongoing outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo, which is now the second deadliest Ebola outbreak in history.No human cases of Ebola are linked to this discovery and Liberia has remained free of any new human cases since the 2013-2016 outbreak. However, this finding brings us closer to understanding where human Ebola cases come from.”There have been unanswered questions about the source of Ebola outbreaks. There was speculation that they may have originated from bats, but there was no direct evidence,” says Simon Anthony, D.Phil, assistant professor of Epidemiology in the Center for Infection and Immunity at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, who led the laboratory discovery. “A critical element in this discovery, was VirCapSeq-VERT, a tool invented at the CII that improves the sensitivity of next generation sequencing 1,000-fold. It is possible that there are also other bat species that carry Ebola. Going forward, we will be analyzing additional specimens to fill in the picture.””This discovery is a major step forward in understanding how Ebola outbreaks happen,” says EcoHealth Alliance Vice President for Science and Outreach Jonathan Epstein, DVM. Epstein also serves as the lead for USAID-PREDICT in Liberia. “The West African Ebola epidemic was devastating, and it began with a single transmission from an animal to a person. It’s critical that we identify which animals naturally carry Ebola and related viruses – without knowing that, we can’t truly understand and reduce the risk of another outbreak occurring in the region.”The search for wildlife hosts for filoviruses like Ebola is a part of USAID’s PREDICT project, an international initiative to conduct surveillance and build local capacity to detect novel and known zoonotic viruses in nature so that countries are better prepared to prevent and respond to outbreaks. Partners in the discovery include EcoHealth Alliance; the Society for the Conservation of Nature, Liberia; the National Public Health Institute of Liberia; the Forest Development Authority; the Liberian Ministry of Agriculture; and Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health; and the University of California, Davis, which leads the PREDICT Consortium.Ebola is a zoonotic disease transmitted from wild animals to humansRelated StoriesVirus employs powerful strategy to inhibit natural killer cell functionPhoseon exhibits KeyPro KP100 UV LED instrument for virus inactivation at World Vaccine CongressResearchers compare American, Pacific and Southeast Asian subtypes of Zika virusEbola virus belongs to the Filoviridae family which also includes the Marburg and Cueva viruses. Like other zoonotic diseases (SARS, influenza, and rabies), Ebola virus is harbored by a natural animal reservoir, in Ebola’s case believed to include one or more species of bat, based on previous scientific studies. Prior Ebola outbreaks in Central Africa have been associated with deforestation and bushmeat hunting, where human cases were linked to contact with and consumption of chimpanzees, gorillas, and duikers that were infected. These animals were also victims of Ebola virus and it’s still a mystery as to exactly how they were infected. However, there is substantial evidence that filoviruses, such as Ebola and Marburg virus, are carried by bats. Marburg virus was recently discovered for the first time in Sierra Leone in its known bat reservoir, but it has historically been difficult to identify bats infected with Ebola virus.Bats play a critical role in ecosystems around the world, by removing pest insect species and pollinating fruiting trees, for example. The finding of Ebola virus in a bat should not be taken as a reason to exterminate, remove or harass bats in their natural environment. In fact, previous work shows that efforts to remove wildlife populations can lead to enhanced disease spread.”The government of Liberia has been not only a committed partner, but is working proactively to prevent further Ebola infections in the country,” says EcoHealth Alliance President Dr. Peter Daszak. “When we shared this discovery with them, they mobilized immediately to share these findings with their citizens. For the government to now be able to offer specific guidance so as to protect people’s health is critical. Past experience has shown that simply telling people not to eat bats is neither practical nor effective. Helping them live safely with bats is.”Keeping local communities safeGreater Long-fingered bats are found in parts of West Africa and other regions. They are an agriculturally important species in the area, as they eat insects which do damage to crops. Additionally, they do not tend to roost in homes or buildings, as some bats do. Instead they are found in forests, caves, and mines which makes preventing contact with them easier by avoiding entering caves or mines. The Liberian government is working to engage local communities about this finding to help reduce the possible risk of exposure and educate people about the positive impacts of bat species on pest control and the environment.Moving forwardFurther testing is underway to determine whether or not the virus detected in this bat is the same strain which caused the West African Ebola epidemic. The PREDICT team is also working with partners to understand how commonly these bats or other bat species may be infected with Ebola virus and whether there are any seasonal patterns to infection in bats, all of which helps understand risk to people and will inform public health strategies designed to prevent another Ebola outbreak.”This discovery is the result of an extraordinarily productive partnership between the government of Liberia, CII, EcoHealth Alliance, and UC Davis,” says Ian Lipkin, MD, director of CII. “It builds on years of investment and methods established under the auspices of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in biodefense and emerging infectious diseases.”Source: https://www.mailman.columbia.edu/last_img read more