Tag: 贵族宝贝上海手机版

How Lonny Uses Pinterest to Mix Up Its Instagram Feed Behind the

first_img The photo was pulled from Pinterest, where Gagnier says it’s normally easy to find an image source. However, in this case, Lonny gave credit to the network itself. Gagnier says she would adjust the credit if anyone let her know who took the picture. “Our followers seem to respond well to dramatic lifestyle and landscape images, and this photo with all of the flowers in bloom really stuck out to me,” says Briana Gagnier, photo editor at Lonny, which launched in 2009 and is published by Livingly Media.  “I think this post was successful because it’s eye-catching and shareable. If you see something that makes you say, ‘wow,’ you’re going to want to share that with someone,” Gagnier says. “And high shareability leads to more engagement and impressions.” Number of likes: 6,903 // Number of comments: 96 // Impressions: 80,800 Perhaps that’s why this post of the flowery Churchill Arms Pub and Restaurant in London saw more than double the brand’s the normal engagement, making it the most-liked Instagram post by Lonny, yet.center_img Magazine: Lonny //  Instagram: @lonnymag // Social Editor: Briana Gagnier // Photo Credit: Unknown/Pinterest Pro Tip: Source from Pinterest and other social networks to add some diversity to your magazine’s aesthetic — but always give credit where credit is due. Most of Lonny’s Instagram posts are of fresh and contemporary interior designs, giving followers a taste of how rugs and pillows can come together to transform a room into a piece of art. But every once in a while, the California-based digital design magazine — “Your go-to resource for accessible design inspiration” — posts something more inspirational than accessible.last_img read more

Dr Oz The Good Life Cuts Frequency Guts Staff

first_imgHearst Magazines is pulling back on wellness title Dr. Oz The Good Life, reducing its print frequency from 10 issues per year to four and laying off several staffers, multiple sources close to the situation tell Folio:. “Dr. Oz THE GOOD LIFE has been among the top ten best-selling brands on the newsstand since it launched in 2014. We’re always looking at new business models for our products, so we’re leaning into the magazine’s strong consumer franchise and pivoting to a quarterly frequency of high-quality bookazines. Dr. Oz THE GOOD LIFE content will also run in a variety of brands across our portfolio.” In response to an inquiry, a Hearst Magazines spokesperson provided the following statement: The news comes as a bit of a surprise, given Hearst’s own recent claims that ad sales for the three-year-old magazine rose 17 percent year-over-year in 2016, coupled with a 16 percent hike to the book’s rate base — to 925,000 — to start this year. That’s up from the 450,000 rate base at which Dr. Oz The Good Life debuted in 2014.center_img The spokesperson did not confirm just how many staffers are being let go as a result of said pivot, nor whether editor-in-chief Jill Herzig or VP and publisher Kristine Welker are among them. This is a developing story.last_img read more

UNICEF appeals for 761m for Rohingya children

first_imgUNICEF is launching a US$76.1 million appeal for its emergency humanitarian response to the Rohingya refugee crisis in Bangladesh.The appeal will cover immediate needs of newly-arrived Rohingya children, as well as those who arrived before the recent influx, and children from vulnerable host communities.Such number, according to a UNICEF news release, is 720,000 children in all.Up to 60 per cent of the 500,000-plus Rohingya who have fled Myanmar since 25 August are estimated to be children, said the UNICEF.Most are now living in harsh and insanitary conditions in makeshift camps and settlements spread across the district of Cox’s Bazar, observed the global body.“Desperate, traumatised children and their families are fleeing the violence in Myanmar every day. We are scaling up our response as fast as we can, but the magnitude of need is immense and we must be able do more to help them,” said UNICEF executive director Anthony Lake, who is visiting Cox’s Bazar.“These children are being denied a childhood. They need our help now and they need our help to have a future.”Expanding the provision of safe water, sanitation and improved hygiene for Rohingya children is the overriding priority of the appeal, amid concerns over a possible outbreak of diarrhea and other waterborne diseases, according to the UNICEF.It said the majority of Rohingya children are not fully immunised against diseases such as polio.An earlier UNICEF appeal for US$7 million has been expanded to reflect the fast-growing scale of the crisis.last_img read more

Rohingya refugees protest against repatriation move

first_imgRohingya refugees line up for daily essentials distribution at Balukhali camp, near Cox`s Bazar, Bangladesh on 15 January 2018. ReutersHundreds of Rohingya refugees staged protests in Bangladesh on Friday against plans to send them back to Myanmar, where a military crackdown last year sparked a mass exodus.The refugees chanted slogans and held banners demanding citizenship and guarantees of security before they return to their home state of Rakhine in Myanmar.The protest came ahead of a visit by UN special rapporteur Yanghee Lee to the camps in southeastern Bangladesh where around a million of the Muslim minority are now living.Bangladesh has reached an agreement with Myanmar to send back the around 750,000 refugees who have arrived since October 2016 over the next two years, a process set to begin as early as next week.But many Rohingya living in the crowded, unsanitary camps have said they do not want to return to Rakhine after fleeing atrocities including murder, rape and arson attacks on their homes.Rights groups and the UN say any repatriation must be voluntary.They have also expressed concerns about conditions in Myanmar, where many Rohingya settlements have been burned to the ground by soldiers and Buddhist mobs.The government has said it is building temporary camps to accommodate the returnees, a prospect feared by Rohingya, said Mohibullah, a refugee and former teacher.“We want safe zones in Arakan (Rakhine) before repatriation,” he told AFP by phone from Cox’s Bazar, where the camps are located.“We want a UN peacekeeping force in Arakan. We want fundamental rights and citizenship. We do not want repatriation without life guarantees,” Mohibullah said.Police said they were unaware of the protests.A Bangladesh official said around 6,500 Rohingya currently living in no man’s land between the two countries would be among the first to be repatriated.The repatriation deal does not cover the estimated 200,000 Rohingya refugees who were living in Bangladesh prior to October 2016, driven out by previous rounds of communal violence and military operations.last_img